The Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences acknowledges Australia’s First Nations Peoples as the Traditional Owners and Custodians of the land and gives respect to the Elders – past and present – and through them to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are advised that the MAAS website contains a range of Indigenous Cultural Material. This includes artworks, artifacts, images and recordings of people who may have passed away, and other objects which may be culturally sensitive.

Ceramic highlights

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This set is drawn from the Museum's ceramics holdings which form one of the largest collections within decorative arts and design. The collection encompasses Australian and international objects with a significant Asian component. While objects from antiquity and 16th and 17th centuries are included, the particular emphasis is on the last three hundred years.

Areas of particular strength are 20th century Australian studio ceramics and 19th century English vases and tableware particularly late 19th and early 20th century Doulton ceramics. The collection includes significant examples of leading European factories such as Meissen, Wedgwood, Sevres, Mintons, Worcester and Doulton from the 18th century to contemporary. This includes Art Nouveau and Modernist European ceramics, Art Deco and Postmodern designs and a specialist collection of turn-of-the-century English 'art pottery' and tableware inspired by Australian flora and fauna and produced for the Australian market. Australian holdings include convict-made bottles, commercial ceramics, late colonial pottery made by German immigrant potters, examples of work of early 20th century china painters, the Craft Movement of the 1950s-80s and contemporary Australian Indigenous pottery.