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2001/3/8 Binaural stethoscope, metal / rubber / plastic, Eschmann, England, 1945-1960. Click to enlarge.

Binaural stethoscope by Eschmann

Made
Although a binaural stethoscope (for use with both ears) was proposed as early as 1829, doctors had to wait until 1851 to buy one. The monaural type was still popular after 1900 and is used in some countries today, but the binaural stethoscope predominates. This one was made in England between 1945 and 1960. In our era of high-tech medicine, the low-tech stethoscope symbolises the knowledge and authority of physicians, who can diagnose illness and prescribe treatment after listening to the …

Summary

Object No.

2001/3/8

Object Statement

Binaural stethoscope, metal / rubber / plastic, Eschmann, England, 1945-1960

Physical Description

Binaural stethoscope with a pair of black plastic earpieces attached to metal and black rubber tubing with a hinged T-junction and black plastic bell and metal diaphragm chestpiece.

Marks

On the rear face of the diaphragm is engraved, 'ESCHMANN ENGLAND'.

Dimensions

Width

135 mm

Depth

30 mm

Production

Notes

Eschmann Equipment is a manufacturer of surgical instruments which was established in 1830 and originally traded under the name Eschmann Brothers & Walsh.

History

Notes

The donor claims that this stethoscope was purchased by him and used sometime in the 1940s. The donor was a medical doctor, specialising in respiratory disorders.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Dr Bryan Gandevia, 2001

Acquisition Date

15 January 2001

Cite this Object

Harvard

Binaural stethoscope by Eschmann 2022, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 6 December 2022, <https://ma.as/9975>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/9975 |title=Binaural stethoscope by Eschmann |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=6 December 2022 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}