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2000/121/5 Speculum, gynaecological surgical instrument, 'Sims', metal, Eschmann, England, United Kingdom, date unknown, used Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1960-1980. Click to enlarge.

‘Sims’ speculum by Eschmann

Made
The Sims vaginal speculum, along with other gynaecological instruments, was used in the 1960s by Dr Geoffrey Davis, who specialised in abortion. Until abortion became lawful in New South Wales in 1971, the procedure was usually discreetly carried out by medical specialists in consulting rooms or clinics in the city. Dr Davis had clinics in two Sydney suburbs, Potts Point and Arncliffe

Originally trained as an anaesthetist, Dr Davis is well known, in Sydney and internationally, for his involvement with the termination of pregnancy. As well as opening the clinics in Sydney in the 1960s Dr Davis worked with Population Services International, the International Fertility Research Program, and the International Planned Parenthood Federation in developing countries such as Bangladesh and India.

Abortion has been used by most cultures throughout history as a way of controlling fertility. In the late 20th/ early 21st century it is the most frequently performed surgical operation in the world. The Sims speculum from a prominent advocate and practitioner of pregnancy termination, along with the other instruments from his clinics, form a significant component of the Powerhouse Museum's collection of birth control material.

Summary

Object No.

2000/121/5

Object Statement

Speculum, gynaecological surgical instrument, 'Sims', metal, Eschmann, England, United Kingdom, date unknown, used Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1960-1980

Physical Description

Gynaecological surgical instrument, Sims speculum, metal, made by Eschmann, England, United Kingdom, date unknown, used Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1960-1980.

Sims speculum, a curved, 'u' shaped surgical instrument. This speculum was donated by Dr Geoffrey Davis from amongst the instruments that he used for termination of pregnancy (abortion) at his clinics.

Marks

Manufacturer's mark inscribed centre, impressed in metal surface "ESCHMANN. ENGLAND / STAINLESS".

Dimensions

Width

35 mm

Depth

85 mm

Production

Notes

This speculum is inscribed 'Eschmann England' suggesting that it was made by the company known as Eschmann Equipment.

The Sims speculum was presumably used by Dr Geoffrey Davis in his clinic in the 1960s and 1970s.

History

Used

Notes

Originally trained as an anaesthetist, Dr Geoffrey Davis is well known for his involvement with the termination of pregnancy. As well as opening clinics in the 1960s in the Sydney suburbs of Potts Point and Arncliffe, Dr Davis has worked with Population Services International, the International Fertility Research Program, and the International Planned Parenthood Federation in developing countries such as Bangladesh and India. When he was close to retirement in 1995 Dr Davis lent items of his own equipment to the Powerhouse Museum for the 'Taking precautions' exhibition, and subsequently donated them to the museum's collection. The donation included this Sims speculum.


The Sims speculum was presumably used by Dr Geoffrey Davis in his clinic in the 1960s and 1970s.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Dr Geoffrey Davis

Acquisition Date

23 November 2000

Cite this Object

Harvard

'Sims' speculum by Eschmann 2020, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 30 September 2020, <https://ma.as/8451>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/8451 |title='Sims' speculum by Eschmann |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=30 September 2020 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.