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87/847 Medallion, 'Am I not a man and a brother?', anti-slavery design, white jasper (stoneware), William Hackwood, Josiah Wedgwood & Sons, Etruria, Staffordshire, England, c. 1840. Click to enlarge.

Anti-salvery medallion made by Wedgwood

Made
This white jasper (stoneware) anti-slavery medallion was made by Josiah Wedgwood and Sons in England in about 1840. Josiah Wedgwood had many interests beyond pottery and was active in social reform. He helped form the Society for the Abolition of the Slave Trade and made these medallions to publicise the cause. Modelled by William Hackwood in 1787, its motto 'Am I not a man and a brother', was adopted by the abolition campaign.

While porcelain continued to play an important role in fashionable interior decoration and daily life in Europe in the 1700s, it was Josiah Wedgwood's pottery that had the greatest impact.

A leading Staffordshire potter in Burslem (now Stoke-on-Trent) since 1759, Wedgwood set up his highly efficient Etruria factory in 1769 to produce an impressive range of vases, ornaments and tableware. Trend-setting classical designs – often by noted artists – new materials and quality production appealed to his 'enlightened' clients. Wedgwood's bold and inventive marketing ensure the popularity of his wares, from royalty to what he called the 'common people'.

Summary

Object No.

87/847

Object Statement

Medallion, 'Am I not a man and a brother?', anti-slavery design, white jasper (stoneware), William Hackwood, Josiah Wedgwood & Sons, Etruria, Staffordshire, England, c. 1840

Physical Description

Anti-slavery medallion, white jasper (stoneware) cameo with a figure of slave in black, Josiah Wedgwood and Sons/William Hackwood/Henry Webber, England, c 1840

Marks

'Am I not a man and a brother?' around edge of medallion
'WEDGWOOD' impressed on reverse

Dimensions

Height

30 mm

Width

27 mm

Depth

3 mm

Source

Credit Line

Purchased 1987

Acquisition Date

15 July 1987

Cite this Object

Harvard

Anti-salvery medallion made by Wedgwood 2020, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 26 November 2020, <https://ma.as/78929>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/78929 |title=Anti-salvery medallion made by Wedgwood |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=26 November 2020 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}