Maximum-minimum thermometer

This maximum-minimum thermometer, which registers the upper and lower temperatures of the atmosphere between readings, probably helped Tooth’s brewery maintain the correct temperature range for making beer. This type of thermometer, in which the highest and lowest temperatures between readings are indicated by markers moved by the mercury, was invented by James Six around 1780. In 1902 the maker of this one, Giles Zeal of London, patented the mercury-filled compressible glass chamber at the top,...

Summary

86/4042
Thermometer, maximum-minimum, mercury / glass / metal / string, made by Zeal, London, England, date unknown, used by Tooth and Co, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

A thermometer, made of metal, glass and string, which consists of a rectangular metal case in which sits a metal plate. A U-shaped thermometer is secured on metal plate with small metal band and screws. Engraved onto metal plate is text which reads, 'MIN / 0 / 10 / 20 / 30 / 40 / 50 / 60 / 70 / 80 / 90 / 100 / 110' and to the right 'MAX / 0 / 19 / 20 / 30 / 40 / 50 / 60 / 70 / 80 / 90 / 100 / 110'.

Dimensions

54 mm
234 mm
33 mm

History

This thermometer was used by Tooth and Co., Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Tooth & Co Limited

Source

Gift of Tooth & Company Ltd under the Australian Government's Tax Incentives for the Arts Scheme, 1986

Cite this Object

Maximum-minimum thermometer 2016, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 28 March 2017, <https://ma.as/65020>
{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/65020 |title=Maximum-minimum thermometer |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=28 March 2017 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}
Full description  
This object is currently on display in Store 4 at the Museums Discovery Centre
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