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2021/59/1 Larrakitj, 'Mittji', (1 of 12) white clay, natural pigment, acrylic fixative on Gadayka (Darwin stringybark or Eucalyptus tetradonta), made by Wukun Wanambi, Yirrkala, Northern Territory, Australia, c.2021. Click to enlarge.

Mittji by Wukun Wanambi

Made
Manymak I think good. Good to show it to all different people around the world about the Eucalypt. It is not only sacred Gaḏayka (Eucalyptus Tetradonta- Stringybark). But we can use the bark and ḻarrakitj which old people have given to us for painting. That tree has sacred names: Wanambi, Binykurrngu, Mawulul. It is a person of my clan, the Marrakulu. I am happy that this identity is me. That’s the object and I am the person. The person who belongs to that. When we cut the skin or bark and use …

Summary

Object No.

2021/59/1

Object Statement

Larrakitj, 'Mittji', (1 of 12) white clay, natural pigment, acrylic fixative on Gadayka (Darwin stringybark or Eucalyptus tetradonta), made by Wukun Wanambi, Yirrkala, Northern Territory, Australia, c.2021

Physical Description

Mittji, painted larrakitj, white clay, natural pigment, acrylic fixative on stringy bark

Dimensions

Height

2550 null

Width

260 null

Production

Notes

These larrikitj have been made by Yolngu artist, Wukun Wanambi. There are twelve poles in this collection as the artist explains, “one larrakitj can’t stand by itself; it needs a family”. This family of larrikitj are an example of one of the earliest forms of design in Australia and show the stages of making; the bark is stripped white ochre is painted and a final design applied. The finished larrakitj in this family show Wanambi’s fish designs which follow the natural bumps and hollows of the timber, reflecting the pools and holes in which the fish swam.

History

Notes

Wukun Wanambi is an artist from north-east Arnhem Land who works primarily using earth pigments on bark and larrakitj (hollow log coffins), as well as making limited edition prints. Wukun's father, Mithili Wanambi, died before he was able to learn from him to any great degree. He began painting in 1997 as part of an artistic program called the Saltwater project. His arm of the Marrakulu clan is responsible for saltwater imagery, which had not been painted intensively since his father's death in 1981. His caretakers, or Djunggayi—principally the late Yanggarriny Wunungmurra—transferred their knowledge of these designs to Wukun, so that the title to saltwater could be asserted. Some of these designs were outside even his father's public painting repertoire.
Bio supplied by Wanambi’s representative gallery, Buku-Larrnggay Mulka Centre

Source

Credit Line

Purchased 2021

Acquisition Date

30 June 2021

Cite this Object

Harvard

Mittji by Wukun Wanambi 2021, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 7 December 2021, <https://ma.as/648480>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/648480 |title=Mittji by Wukun Wanambi |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=7 December 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}
This object is one of the museum's most recent acquisitions.