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3D printed ceramic vessels by Alterfact

Made
  • 2016
The 3D printed porcelain vessels from Alterfact are the first 3D printed ceramic vessels to be produced in Australia and the first for sale. Alterfact was formed by Lucile Sciallano and Ben Landau after they both graduated from the Design Academy in Eindhoven in 2013. There they were taught by Dries Verbruggan who is one of the Principals of Unfiold Studio in Belgium. Unfold's practice in 3D printed ceramics is some of the seminal work in the field of 3d printing. The vessels are designed on computer but because aspects of the final form are dependant on the circumstances of the print, for example, the wetness of the clay, each vessel in unique.
Alterfact complete their printing on Delta JK Ceramic 3D printers which are created from open source plans. The parts are sourced and the printer assembled by the buyer.

Summary

Object No.

2016/38/1

Object Statement

Vases (2) and cup, 3D printed porcelain, Alterfact, Mebourne 2016

Physical Description

Vase 1
Small porcelain baluster shaped vase with an elongated neck, oval flat base and and round lip formed from white porcelain. The vase has been formed on a 3D printer using an additive coiling technique. At the lip the coils descend into an irregular festoon on one side formed from multiple porcelain threads. The surface of the vase reflects the 3D printing process, revealing low relief ridges on the outside. They are less visible on the inside which is covered with clear glaze. There is a ridge line running up the side opposite the decorative festoon which, like a stocking seam, is an artefact of the fabrication process

Vase 2
Small porcelain vase with an oval base slightly bulging in the centre tapering toward a round rim which has the festoon of loosely hanging porcelain threads on one side.The surface of the vase reflects the 3D printing process, revealing low relief ridges on the outside. They are less visible on the inside which is covered with clear glaze. There is a ridge line running up the side opposite the decorative festoon which, like a stocking seam, is an artefact of the fabrication process.

Cup
White glazed porcelain tumbler rising from a circular base slightly wider at the top. The body is made on a 3D printer using an additive coiling technique. The surface is decorated with a regular continuous pattern of dimples arranged in 14 rows, one above the other, off set. The inside of the base reveals ridged pattern of parallel lines which demonstrate the starting pattern of the print.

Production

Made

  • 2016

Notes

The vessels are produced using an extrusion type 3D printer designed for clay. The effect is to have a computer controlled clay coiling system. Once formed on the printer the vessels are dried before being fired. Glazing depends on the design of the particular vessel. The design for each vessel is specified on a computer file but in some instances there is manual manipulation of the extrusion head to achieve particular effects. Alterfact used a Delta JK Ceramic 3D printer which is built using open source plans originally produced by Jonathan Keep.

History

Notes

This type of clay printing was pioneered by Dreis Vergruggen and Claire Warneir from Unfold Design Studious in Belgium. Lucile Sciallano and Ben Landau who formed Altefact both graduted from the Design Academy in Einhoven in 2014 where they trained under Dreis Verbruggan.

Source

Credit Line

Purchased with funds from the MAAS Foundation, 2016

Acquisition Date

12 October 2016

Cite this Object

Harvard

3D printed ceramic vessels by Alterfact 2020, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 26 November 2020, <https://ma.as/539940>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/539940 |title=3D printed ceramic vessels by Alterfact |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=26 November 2020 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

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