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2014/80/2 Blackmagic cinema camera prototype, plaster, designed and made by Blackmagic Design, Port Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 2011-2012. Click to enlarge.

Prototype for Blackmagic Cinema Camera

Designed by Blackmagic Industrial Design Team in Port Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 2011-2012.

This is an appearance model for the Blackmagic Cinema Camera. It was used to communicate the design concept within the Blackmagic team during the development process. Made using rapid prototyping, it allowed designers to evaluate volume, ergonomics and button layout details and improve them in the final design. The sunshade on the final product was modified to improve visibility compared to this model. This object represents the widespread use of rapid prototyping, or 3D printing, in the contemp...

Summary

Object No.

2014/80/2

Object Statement

Blackmagic cinema camera prototype, plaster, designed and made by Blackmagic Design, Port Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 2011-2012

Physical Description

Grey prototype or appearance model for Blackmagic Cinema Camera, including lens and monitor shade.

Marks

No marks

Production

Notes

Designed by the Blackmagic Industrial Design Team in Port Melbourne, Australia, 2011-2012.

This object was made using rapid prototyping, specifically using Z-Corp powder-based 3D printing technology. This technique forms objects one layer at a time using bed of powder (plaster). The inkjet printer head sprays binder over the cross section of the part where it solidifies the powder. A roller spreads a layer of powder across the object and the process repeats until the object is formed. Colour can be included as part of the printing process to indicate material or part breaks and logos or graphics. Once complete, the excess powder can be brushed off and recycled. Objects made using this technique tend to be fragile, but can be strengthened by applying binders to the completed object. This prototyping process produces quick and fairly accurate 3D form studies. It is typically used to evaluate concepts in terms of look/feel, size and ergonomics.

Manufacture of the prototype was outsourced. At the time of acquisition the details of the manufacturer were confidential.

History

Notes

This object was displayed in the 2013 Australian International Design Awards exhibition at the Powerhouse Museum from July 2013 - August 2014. Prior to this it was used to communicate the design concept within the Blackmagic Design team during the development process.

The Blackmagic Cinema Camera received the Australian International Design Award of the Year in 2013.

The jury commented:
"A truly brilliant piece of design and technology in every regard. This product has significant cultural implications on the global film industry, putting high end filmmaking within the reach of the mass-market. A showcase of what professional design can do when used effectively - it will revolutionize the film industry and highlight Australia's capability to design and develop high technology products with global appeal." *
* Australian International Design Awards (AIDA) Yearbook 2013

The camera also received a Red Dot 'Best of the Best' Award in 2013.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Blackmagic Design Australia, 2014

Acquisition Date

12 August 2014

Cite this Object

Harvard

Prototype for Blackmagic Cinema Camera 2019, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 8 December 2019, <https://ma.as/509797>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/509797 |title=Prototype for Blackmagic Cinema Camera |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=8 December 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

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