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2014/52/1 FCS II surfboard fins (3) in retail packaging, and fin plugs (3), mixed media, designed by Surf Hardware International, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, made in China, 2013. Click to enlarge.

FCS II removable fin system by Surf Hardware International

Made in China, Asia, 2013.

FCS II is the first high performance fin system to be removable by hand. The fin plugs are installed into a surfboard during manufacture. Each plug contains a mechanism which allows for the fins to be removed and replaced from the board without the need for tools. The FCS II system is designed for surfers of all ability and stays securely attached to the board even when tested by elite surfers. It can be used with older style FCS fins too.

The FCS II fin system represents a continuation of Aust...

Summary

Object No.

2014/52/1

Object Statement

FCS II surfboard fins (3) in retail packaging, and fin plugs (3), mixed media, designed by Surf Hardware International, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, made in China, 2013

Physical Description

Three surfboard fins in plastic and cardboard retail packaging with instruction booklet. Three separate fin plugs or fin boxes. The fin plugs are usually installed into a surfboard during manufacture.

Contained within a plastic bag labelled in handwritten black pen 'FCSII / PRODUCTION / PLUGS + PREMIUM / FINS'.

Production

Notes

The FCS II removable fin system was designed by Michael Durante, Gregory Scott, Scott Norrie and Linden Evans at Surf Hardware International / Fin Control Systems Pty Ltd, Mona Vale, NSW, Australia, 2012- 2013.
The fins were made in China, 2013

The key innovation in this system is that the fins can be removed from the plug and surfboard by hand, without the use of tools. Previous removable fin systems required a tool to secure the fins to the board and subsequently remove them.

The FCS II Australian International Design Awards 2013 entry describes the system:

"A titanium tension bar and self lubricating polymer barrel interact with a detail in each fin to mechanically lock the fin to the fin box with a combination of downward and lateral force. This design feature removes the need for a specialized tool, required by current fin systems, to secure the fin to the board. By eliminating the tool, the surfer can rapidly adapt their equipment to the conditions (on land and in water) and easily prepare boards for transport.

The system's construction has been designed to operate as an integral part of the surfboard. The hybrid structure of the fin plug or box includes a perforated polymer skeleton, over-molded with polyurethane foam. This creates a lightweight composite, whilst giving it structural integrity in high stress areas. The extension of the foam through to the top surface allows for a strong mechanical and chemical bond to the surrounding fiberglass surfboard laminate. This increases strength, offers resistance to fracture during impact, and most importantly transfers, rather than absorbs, energy from the surfer to the fin.

The non-linear form of FCS II is designed to eliminate fracture focal points in the fiberglass skin of the surfboard while giving it a secure and appealing footprint at the base of the fin. The perforated structure of the polymer frame combined with the exposed polyurethane foam communicates the light weight construction of the product to the surfer.

In addition to the FCS II plug, the leading edge of the fin is now seamlessly secured in the plug, and the fins tabs are longer. These features create a solid connection to the board while minimizing water disruption." **

** FCS II Australian International Design Awards entry (2013) http://www.gooddesignaustralia.com/awards/past/entry/fcs-ii/?year=2013 [accessed 25 March 2014]

The surf fins are the 'Essential series: performance thruster'. They are made from 'performance core' material:

"Performance Core material and construction is designed to deliver the feeling of a traditional fibreglass fin with the added performance of reduced weight. The RTM (Resin Transfer Moulding) process produces a lightweight fin with remarkable flex, a smooth feel and an impressive aesthetic." *

*FCS website (2013) http://www.surffcs.com.au/shop/surf-thrusters/fcs-ii-performer-pc-carbon-tri-set, [accessed 25 March 2014]

FIN SPECS: SMALL

Base: 4.25" / 108mm
Depth: 4.43" / 112mm
Area: 14.03"² / 9054mm²
Sweep: 33.7º
Foil: Inside

Australian Patent application 2013204785

Made

China, Asia 2013

History

Notes

These objects were lent to the Museum for display in the 2013 Australian International Design Awards exhibition from July 2013 to July 2014 and subsequently donated to the Museum's collection.

The FCS II fin system received the Good Design Selection and Powerhouse Museum Selection at the 2013 Australian International Design Awards organised by Good Design Australia. The FCS II system also received a Red Dot Design Award in 2013.

The three fin surfboard was first developed by Australian surfer Simon Anderson in 1980. The removable fin concept was invented by Brian Whitty in Australia in the 1990s to enable easier manufacture of the new three-fin 'thruster' surfboards.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Surf Hardware International, 2014

Acquisition Date

7 May 2014

Cite this Object

Harvard

FCS II removable fin system by Surf Hardware International 2019, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 20 September 2019, <https://ma.as/494789>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/494789 |title=FCS II removable fin system by Surf Hardware International |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=20 September 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

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