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2013/19/1 Architectural model, Villa Shodhan, scale 1:25, MDF wood, designed by Le Corbusier, Chandigarh, India, 1951-1956, made by Iain Scott-Stevenson, mixed media, Powerhouse Museum, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2011-2012. Click to enlarge.

Model of Villa Shodhan designed by Le Corbusier

Made by Scott-Stevenson, Iain in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2011-2012.

The Villa Shodhan is one of three houses designed by Le Corbusier for prominent families in Ahmedabad, Gujurat, while he was working on the design of Chandigarh, capital city of Punjab. Initially designed for another member of the Ahmedabad Millowners Association, the house was built for Shyamubhai Shodhan, a textile manufacturer, his wife and four children. It is still owned and used by the Shodhan family.

During the 1920s Le Corbusier formulated his ‘Five points of architecture’ which were e...

Summary

Object No.

2013/19/1

Object Statement

Architectural model, Villa Shodhan, scale 1:25, MDF wood, designed by Le Corbusier, Chandigarh, India, 1951-1956, made by Iain Scott-Stevenson, mixed media, Powerhouse Museum, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2011-2012

Physical Description

A model of Villa Shodhan consisting of two separate but connected buildings:

The Shodhan family villa, a cubical structure consisting of three main floors beneath a flat roof supported by four rows of columns which run from ground level. The ground floor is a double-height entry hall and a mezzanine, the second floor is bedrooms and an open terrace. The third floor is living spaces composed of a variety of open and enclosed spaces. The floors and other structural elements of the model are painted white (site-cast unpainted concrete in the original) in which colour painted timber and plaster doors and windows are set. An enclosed ramp runs from the ground floor to the third floor, meeting a stairway to the top of the main living room. There are two apertures in the roof, above the terrace on the living floor. The facades are partly enclosed by sun-shades.

A single floor flat-roofed structure containing a kitchen, servants' accommodation and storage. This structure has vertical slit windows and several large openings.

Marks

No marks

Dimensions

Height

630 mm

Width

850 mm

Depth

2010 mm

Production

Notes

Iain Scott-Stevenson was the Powerhouse Museum's model maker. Iain trained at the National Art School in Darlinghurst and worked as a draughtsman for various architects before moving to the UK where he worked for a model making firm. He prepared numerous models for projects including town plans, Saudi Arabian oil refineries, and military sites. After returning to Australia from the UK, Iain joined the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences where he worked as a model maker for more than 25 years.

Designed

Le Corbusier Chand?garh, Punjab, India, Asia 1951-1956

History

Notes

This model was made during 2011 and 2012 for a planned Le Corbusier exhibition. It was intended to be part of chronology of small (1:200) models representing all of Le Corbusier's house designs, with a small number of larger (1:25) models representing his most significant projects in this field.

Source

Credit Line

Ex-Museum

Acquisition Date

22 February 2013

Cite this Object

Harvard

Model of Villa Shodhan designed by Le Corbusier 2016, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 26 June 2019, <https://ma.as/460932>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/460932 |title=Model of Villa Shodhan designed by Le Corbusier |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=26 June 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.

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