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2012/10/1 Network switching and connection devices (17), collection of prototypes for Wavelength Selective Switches (WSS) device, electronic components / optical components, designed and made by Engana / Optium / Finisar, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2001-2008. Click to enlarge.

Prototypes for intelligent optical subsystems that can be remotely reconfigured in broadband networks

Made
  • 2001-2008
In 2001 a team of veterans from previously successful photonic start-ups observed the looming explosion in data traffic (and hence bandwidth). The start-up team included Simon Poole, Dr Steve Frisken, Andrew Bartos, Andrew Kennedy and Ian Clark. This group had intellectual property and patents they wished to develop into practical devices to handle very high bandwidth. This team identified a need, a market, the customers and the competitors. After providing initial funding to start the company …

Summary

Object No.

2012/10/1

Object Statement

Network switching and connection devices (17), collection of prototypes for Wavelength Selective Switches (WSS) device, electronic components / optical components, designed and made by Engana / Optium / Finisar, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2001-2008

Physical Description

Twenty-seven pieces of assembled and partly assembled photonic/electronic devices demonstrating the evolution of the Wavelength Selective Switching device.

Production

Made

  • 2001-2008

Notes

The prototypes demonstrate the refinements and modification of the WSS product as the Engana team took their original ideas and tested them. The whole project underwent a tremendous shift early on when they realised they should be building a dynamic, programmable and customer modifiable product.

In 2001 a team of veterans from previously successful photonic start ups observed the looming explosion in data traffic (and hence bandwidth). This group had intellectual property and patents they wished to develop into practical devices to handle very high bandwidth. This team identified a need, a market, the customers and the competitors and after providing initial funding to start the company (Engana) and commence prototype development they sought further funding. An investor presentation in 2002 raised 5.3 million and in 2005 Engana sought a further $8m to fund product extension and a ramp up in manufacturing of their initial product. In 2006 Engana was purchased by Optium for $42 million; Optium was subsequently acquired by Finisar in 2008 for $211 million.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Finisar Australia, 2012

Acquisition Date

9 January 2012

Cite this Object

Harvard

Prototypes for intelligent optical subsystems that can be remotely reconfigured in broadband networks 2020, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 14 May 2021, <https://ma.as/418990>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/418990 |title=Prototypes for intelligent optical subsystems that can be remotely reconfigured in broadband networks |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=14 May 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}