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2009/72/1 Carpet, 'Khanate of Bukhara', knotted wool, made by a Turkmen Beshir weaver, western Central Asia, c. 1850. Click to enlarge.

Turkmen Beshir carpet from Central Asia

Made
  • c.1850
This Turkmen Beshir carpet is a lovely example of the superb weaving traditions of the once nomadic Turkmen women of western Central Asia. It is rare to find Beshir carpets of this age in such fine condition. There are five main Turkmen tribes: the Tekke, the closely related Salor and Saryk, the Yomut who live just east of the Caspian Sea, the Ersari who live along the Amu Darya, and the Chodor, all of whom produce rugs in characteristic Turkmen style. While also acknowledged as Turkmen, those …

Summary

Object No.

2009/72/1

Object Statement

Carpet, 'Khanate of Bukhara', knotted wool, made by a Turkmen Beshir weaver, western Central Asia, c. 1850

Physical Description

Knotted wool carpet, with intact flat weave ends, featuring in the field a variation on the 'herati' pattern borrowed from Iran (Persia). Typically for Turkmen rugs and carpets, and carpets from this area, the principal colours are a glowing red on a dark blue ground with natural and light blue accents.

Marks

No marks.

Dimensions

Width

1470 mm

Production

Made

  • c.1850

Notes

This carpet was made by a Turkmen Beshir weaver in western Central Asia, c. 1850.

In this Turkmen Beshir carpet, a variation of the herati pattern has been used as an allover pattern in the field. The carpet is asymmetrically knotted.

The 'herati' pattern takes its name from the city of Herat in Northwestern Afghanistan. It is however found mainly in handmade carpets from Iran and is generally used as an all-over repeat motif. Typically, the herati pattern consists of a flower inside a rhomb shape surrounded by four acanthus-leaves which are often referred to as fishes because of their curling shape.

History

Notes

The carpet was purchased privately by the vendor in New York in 2008. The purchase for the Museum has been sponsored by the Oriental Rug Society of NSW (ORS), following consultation by the ORS committee and the curator.

Source

Credit Line

Purchased with the assistance of the Oriental Rug Society of NSW Inc, 2009

Acquisition Date

26 August 2009

Cite this Object

Harvard

Turkmen Beshir carpet from Central Asia 2021, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 27 October 2021, <https://ma.as/396885>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/396885 |title=Turkmen Beshir carpet from Central Asia |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=27 October 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}