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85/2326 Radiogram, SK55 Phonosuper radio and record player, metal / plastic / timber/ electronic components / rubber, designed by Hans Gugelot in collaboration with Hochschule für Gestaltung (Ulm) School of Design, made by Braun AG, Frankfurt, Germany, 1958, made by Braun AG, West Germany, 1963. Click to enlarge.

Braun SK55 Radiogram designed by Hans Gugelot in collaboration with Hochschule für Gestaltung (Ulm) School of Design

Designed
The Braun SK 55 Phonosuper is a direct descendent of Hans Gugelot and Dieter Rams' SK 4 Radio Phono Combination, designed in 1956. Revolutionary in its appearance the Phonosuper epitomised Braun's efforts to transform and differentiate the image of the company and its products from other manufacturers of dowdy brown timber cased radios with cloth grilles.

The design of the Phonosuper, with its clear acrylic lid and sheet metal body defied existing notions of what a gramophone should look like. Nicknamed “Snow White's coffin" by its detractors it was embraced by consumers and firmly established Braun's reputation in contemporary design.

Campbell Bickerstaff, 2013

Summary

Object No.

85/2326

Object Statement

Radiogram, SK55 Phonosuper radio and record player, metal / plastic / timber/ electronic components / rubber, designed by Hans Gugelot in collaboration with Hochschule für Gestaltung (Ulm) School of Design, made by Braun AG, Frankfurt, Germany, 1958, made by Braun AG, West Germany, 1963

Physical Description

A combination radio and record player housed in a rectangular white lacquered sheet steel unit with shorter sides of polished elm, and a hinged clear perspex lid, which opens for access to the turntable amd controls. The turntable has a rubber and steel grey arm, and grey stylus. Three cylindrical grey knobs placed vertically to the right of the arm, control volume, base and treble. The rectangular radio dial is on the far right, and aligned along the bottom of the operating surface, five small grey rectangular buttons for on/off and radio/phono mode selector. Along the front side are three square blocks of slits for speakers and ventilation. The back has a switch for tape and speaker sockets, and 240 ohm socket. On the bottom is a removeable masonite sheet and a grey power cord extends from the back.

Marks

On the base: 'Braun SK 55 vor Feuchtigkeit Schutzen. Vor Abnehmen Der'.
'Braun' makers logo on top centre of radiogram in black.

Dimensions

Height

245 mm

Depth

290 mm

Weight

12 kg

Production

Notes

Designed by Dieter Rams in cooperation with Hans Gugelot, professor at the Ulm Design School, based on a design by Wilhelm Wagenfeld. Manufactured by Braun AG in Taunus, West Germany in 1963.

History

Notes

Hans Gugelot met Erwin Braun in 1954 and embarked on an important collaboration with Braun. Gugelot was a lecturer at the Ulm Design School, however Dieter Rams was a full-time employee of the Braun Company.

Source

Credit Line

Purchased 1985

Acquisition Date

22 November 1985

Cite this Object

Harvard

Braun SK55 Radiogram designed by Hans Gugelot in collaboration with Hochschule für Gestaltung (Ulm) School of Design 2020, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 26 November 2020, <https://ma.as/39249>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/39249 |title=Braun SK55 Radiogram designed by Hans Gugelot in collaboration with Hochschule für Gestaltung (Ulm) School of Design |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=26 November 2020 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.