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2008/104/1 Protest badges (6), relating to environmental and Indigenous activism, metal / plastic / paper, makers unknown, Australia, 1985-1995. Click to enlarge.

Collection of protest badges

Made
These badges represent some of the key environmental and Indigenous issues of the 1980s and 90s. The previous decades of the 1960s and 70s were periods of great social and political change in Australia, encompassing: the Vietnam War; the lead up to, and the turbulent years following, the dismissal of the Whitlam Labour Government in 1975; and the rise of the international Peace and Women's movements. While environmental and indigenous issues had been discussed for decades, and had been the …

Summary

Object No.

2008/104/1

Object Statement

Protest badges (6), relating to environmental and Indigenous activism, metal / plastic / paper, makers unknown, Australia, 1985-1995

Physical Description

Six protect badges with the following text:

'No forest no future'
'No time to waste / Greenpeace'
'Rainbow Warrior'
'White Australia has a black history'
'May Day 1993, the year of Indigenous people'
'National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Week, July 1995'.

Marks

No marks.

Production

Made

Notes

The makers of the badges are unknown. They were made between 1985 and 1995 in Australia.

History

Notes

These badges were made between 1985 and 1995 in Australia. They represent some of the key environmental and Indigenous issues of the 1980s and 90s.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of G Meshoe, 2008

Acquisition Date

21 May 2008

Cite this Object

Harvard

Collection of protest badges 2021, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 8 December 2021, <https://ma.as/379817>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/379817 |title=Collection of protest badges |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=8 December 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}