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2008/16/2 Amateur radio equipment, metal / plastic / glass / electronic components, designed by various makers, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1970-1989. Click to enlarge.

Amateur radio hardware used by Ron Cameron

Made
The amateur radio transceiver equipment was used by the donor from the early 1970s to the late 1980s. The radio equipment illustrates the donor's fascination with amateur radio and his journey through the radio wave spectrum - from shortwave radio, to joining the Wireless Institute of Australia (WIA) and applying for and being allocated a listener id, to sitting for a Limited Amateur Radio operators licence and the lure of high frequency bands and radio teletype.

Each progression in the system of communication employed brought increasingly complex technological challenges. The archive demonstrates the donor's achievements in building on his levels of skill and expertise in circuit and control system design to deal with these changes.

The donor's eventual employment of a teletype machine in his amateur radio transceiver operations represented a major shift. Teletype machines had been employed as computer input and output mechanisms and by the postal / telecommunication sectors for communications. However the application of teletype equipment to amateur radio was an extraordinary development, in particular it anticipates what even the implementers of modern mobile phone text ability did not anticipate - interpersonal texting.

Campbell Bickerstaff, 2008

Summary

Object No.

2008/16/2

Object Statement

Amateur radio equipment, metal / plastic / glass / electronic components, designed by various makers, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1970-1989

Physical Description

Amateur radio equipment, metal / plastic / glass / electronic components, designed by various makers, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1970-1989

Off the shelf amateur radio transceiver equipment used in conjunction with teletype machine and dedicated home built hardware to send and receive radio and text messages around the world.

Trio - JR200 Communications Receiver.
2 Metre converter - Input 144 - 148 Mhz, Output 28 - 32 Mhz.
Morse Code practice set in an old Strepsils tin.
Yaesu FTV-650, 6 Metre Transverter, (Tx/Rx). 10 Metre (28Mhz) interface to HF transceiver.
6 Metre FM Car phone, including handset on cradle, power supply & transceiver.
small Valve and CRT collection.
Creed 7B Teleprinter rescued from the furnace.
Radio Teletype (RTTY) Terminal Unit (TU) built in an old Canon Desktop Calculator. In service 1977.
Cathode Ray Oscilloscope used to tune the RTTY signal on the Amateur Radio band.
Frequency Counter / Timer and AMTOR (Amateur Microprocessor Teleprinter Over Radio) timing interface.
Siemens M100 Teleprinter c. 1980

Production

Notes

The radio equipment is either off the shelf hardware with identifying markings from various radio equipment manufacturers or was designed and hand built by the donor.

History

Notes

The radio material was either purchased or designed and built by Ron Cameron for use in his radio transceiver set ups from the early 1970s to the late 1980s.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Ron Cameron, 2008

Acquisition Date

31 January 2008

Cite this Object

Harvard

Amateur radio hardware used by Ron Cameron 2020, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 19 October 2020, <https://ma.as/375597>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/375597 |title=Amateur radio hardware used by Ron Cameron |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=19 October 2020 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.