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Telescope, Bearing, No.10, Mk I.

Made 1942

This object is part of a collection relating to the history and development of computing and other information technology assembled by Assoc Professor Allan Bromley of Sydney University, comprising calculators, mechanical and electronic analogue computers, computer components, kit computers, education computers, and associated ephemera.

Allan Bromley was a lecturer and researcher at the University of Sydney Basser Department of Computer Science from 1978 until his untimely death in August 2002....

Summary

Object No.

2010/1/7

Physical Description

Telescopes, bearing (2), No.10, Mk I,and No. 14, Mk II, and eyepiece part, metal / glass, unknown maker, 1942

The bearing telescopes sit on a disc of metal that likely is mounted to a gun predictor. On the top of the object is an eyepiece. A metal tube extends out one side of the eyepiece apparatus. On the No 14. Mk II bearing telescope there is a dial for adjusting the viewer.

The eyepiece part is glass in a metal ring.

Marks

On No I0, Mk I - '1942, Reg No 5169'

Dimensions

Height

120 mm

Width

140 mm

Production

Notes

Unknown

Made

1942

History

Notes

Probably mounted on gun predictors in WWII

Source

Credit Line

Donated through the Australian Government Cultural Gifts Program in memory of Associate Professor Allan Bromley, 2010

Acquisition Date

20 January 2010

Cite this Object

Harvard

Telescope, Bearing, No.10, Mk I. 2018, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 18 November 2018, <https://ma.as/371685>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/371685 |title=Telescope, Bearing, No.10, Mk I. |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=18 November 2018 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.

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