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2007/124/1 Electronic programmable calculator, AL-1000, with cover and instruction manual, metal / plastic / electronic components / paper, made by Casio Computer Co Ltd, Tokyo, Japan, 1967. Click to enlarge.

Casio AL-1000 calculator

Made
The A-1000 is one of the very first electronic programmable calculators. (The Casio Company claims it is the first programmable Japanese desktop calculator). It is a desk-top calculator that uses transistor electronics, ferrite core memory and Nixie tubes for numeric display. While its applications were restricted to mathematical calculation it anticipates the arrival of personal computing.

Summary

Object No.

2007/124/1

Object Statement

Electronic programmable calculator, AL-1000, with cover and instruction manual, metal / plastic / electronic components / paper, made by Casio Computer Co Ltd, Tokyo, Japan, 1967

Physical Description

Electronic programmable calculator, AL-1000, with cover and instruction manual, metal / plastic / electronic components / paper, made by Casio Computer Co Ltd, Tokyo, Japan, 1967

The calculator is a beige plastic casing with a darker beige/brown sloping keyboard and switch panel and "Nixie Tube" numeric display. The keyboard has a push-button power switch, several selector switches and three sets of keys. The left set are six memory select keys, the middle set is a decimal keypad of eleven keys and the right set are six operation keys. The calculator has a grey power cord.

The cover for the calculator is grey plastic with (damaged) clear window for numeric display.

The operator's instruction manual is printed on A4 size paper stock with blue cover.

Marks

CASIO AL-1000 on front. Maker's plate on back 'Casio AL1000/AC 240 V/NO 53715/CASIO COMPUTER CO. LTD./TOKYO JAPAN'.

Dimensions

Height

240 mm

Width

380 mm

Depth

440 mm

Weight

12 kg

Production

Notes

Manufactured in Japan by Casio, 1967.

History

Notes

The calculator was originally owned by Helmut Bonzol (the donor's father) who used it for engineering calculations in his work with the company Pre built Steel Constructions which made pre-fabricated steel constructions. The company was started, c.1955, by Bonzol with two friends. One was the person who sponsored the Bonzol family to Australia and the other was a cousin (donor's uncle ?). Bonzol had trained as a boilermaker but due to the war did not get his full engineering qualifications. He worked in construction in the UK before the family emigrated to Australia in 1954/5(?).

The donor has described Bonzol as being always interested in the latest gadget of which this calculator was a good example at the time of purchase - soon after its appearance on the market in 1967.

His company did work for Boral making all their tanks [see http://www.boral.com.au/history/] - including what the donor described as the "sputnik" styled spherical (LPG?) ones. They also designed and manufactured suspended and hanging awnings for Mirvac. Other work included warehouse fabrications.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Ursula Bonzol, 2007

Acquisition Date

13 September 2007

Cite this Object

Harvard

Casio AL-1000 calculator 2020, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 26 October 2020, <https://ma.as/365845>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/365845 |title=Casio AL-1000 calculator |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=26 October 2020 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}