The Powerhouse acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of the ancestral homelands upon which our museums are situated. We respect their Elders, past, present and future and recognise their continuous connection to Country.
2006/145/2 Covered jar, 'My Pig Is Looking for Food', earthenware, made by Irene Entata, Hermannsburg, Northern Territory, Australia, 1991. Click to enlarge.

Earthenware covered jar by Irene Entata, Hermannsburg, 1991

Made
Titled 'My Pig Is Looking for Food', this moulded and painted earthenware jar was made in 1991 by Aboriginal potter, Irene Entata, at Hermannsburg, a former Lutheran mission located 130 kilometres west of Alice Springs in the Northern Territory. Introduced to the Hermannsburg community in late 1990, pottery would become an important form of traditional and modern expression for the local people. Their early work, including this piece, consisted mostly of rounded jars with sculpted lids, …

Summary

Object No.

2006/145/2

Object Statement

Covered jar, 'My Pig Is Looking for Food', earthenware, made by Irene Entata, Hermannsburg, Northern Territory, Australia, 1991

Physical Description

Covered jar, 'My Pig Is Looking for Food', with label, moulded earthenware with painted underglaze, made and decorated by Irene Entata, Hermannsburg, Northern Territory, Australia, 1991

A round hand-formed pot in thick clay with a sculpted lid representing the head of a pig. Around the base is a painted pink ground, black and aqua forms, and white paint applied in the 'dot painting' style. The interior is glazed. Accompanying the pot is a folded, beige cardboard label. The label reads 'Hermannsburg Potters, 'My Pig Is Looking for Food', entirely hand crafted and painted by the Aranda people from Hermannsburg, Central Australia, Irene Entata, Artist'. On the back is hand-printed 'No.26, $110-'.

Marks

Irene Entata inscribed on base.

Dimensions

Height

195 mm

Production

Notes

Hermannsburg potter, Irene Entata, made this earthenware jar and lid in 1991 as part of a pottery program funded by the Northern Territory Open College of TAFE. Program leader, Naomi Sharp, taught the local men and women to construct the pots by coiling long strips of clay into rounded forms and levelling the surfaces with wooden paddles. The surfaces were smoothed further by rubbing the clay with a wet cloth and scraping it with a rib. The sculpted lids recalled the clay figurines that were made in Hermannsburg in the 1950s under the encouragement of the Lutheran missionaries.

Naomi Sharp described this production process in a 1991 interview: 'We use a terracotta clay which is the same colour as the red earth here and the people love using it. We solve the problem of the clay drying so quickly by keeping the pots covered with wet cloths. They learned to roll a coil and attach it rapidly while wetting down the pot constantly with a cloth as they worked. With day-time temperatures of 45°C and extremely low humidity, even clay exposed for five minutes becomes dry, it cracks and becomes unworkable' (Joy Irvine, 'The Hermannsburg Potters' in 'Ceramics: Art and Perception', No.6, 1991, pp.22-23).

History

Notes

Curator of Australian decorative arts and design, Grace Cochrane, purchased these three items from the inaugural exhibition of Hermannsburg pottery, held in 1991 at Gallery Gondwana in Alice Springs. The exhibition comprising seventy-six works by twenty-one artists. Grace donated these three pieces to the museum in 2006, following her retirement. They join two other Hermmansburg pots, 'Bush Coconut and Orange' (91/1273) and 'Water Birds' (91/1274), that the Powerhouse Museum purchased in 1991 from the same exhibition.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Grace Cochrane, 2006

Acquisition Date

8 November 2006

Cite this Object

Harvard

Earthenware covered jar by Irene Entata, Hermannsburg, 1991 2021, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 28 July 2021, <https://ma.as/362637>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/362637 |title=Earthenware covered jar by Irene Entata, Hermannsburg, 1991 |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=28 July 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}