Embroidered sandwich doily, ‘Sydney Harbour Bridge’

Made in Australia, Oceania, 1932.

This sandwich doily featuring the Sydney Harbour Bridge forms part of a collection of 19th and 20th century Australian embroidery and needlework, given to the Museum by Ian Rumsey and known as the Ian Rumsey Australian Textiles Collection. The collection was assembled by the donor, a private collector, over two decades and includes doilies, milk jug covers, tablecloths, placemats, towels, banners, aprons, samplers, runners and cushion covers, all featuring Australian motifs. Ian Rumsey was drawn...

Summary

2010/11/19
Sandwich doily, embroidered, linen / cotton, Sydney Harbour Bridge design, maker unknown, Australia, 1932

A hand embroidered cream linen sandwich doily. It is rectangular in shape and bulges at both ends. It features a Sydney Harbour Bridge design in red, light blue, green and brown thread. On the water underneath the bridge is a small boat, embroidered in red and brown thread. The bridge and boat are encircled by an oval stitched with light blue thread and there is a bouquet of green leaves at each end. The edge has been crocheted in two different shades of blue.

Dimensions

280 mm

Production

The design of this small indented oval sandwich doily features the Sydney Harbour Bridge with a small boat passing underneath it. The embroidery is worked on the linen ground in stem and chain stitch in red, brown, grey and green cotton thread. The mat is edged with a frilled crocheted edging in two or three shades of blue.
1932

Source

Gift of Ian Rumsey, 2010
23 March, 2010

Cite this Object

Embroidered sandwich doily, 'Sydney Harbour Bridge' 2017, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 23 November 2017, <https://ma.as/362391>
{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/362391 |title=Embroidered sandwich doily, 'Sydney Harbour Bridge' |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=23 November 2017 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}
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