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2006/52/3 Prototype torch body, Eveready 'Dolphin', nylon, designed and made by Design Resource Australia Pty Ltd, Crows Nest, New South Wales, Australia, 2001. Click to enlarge.

Prototype of 5th generation ‘Dolphin’ torch body

Made by Design Resource Australia Pty Ltd in Crows Nest, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2001.

This prototype was designed and made by Design Resource at Crows Nest in NSW in 2001 as part of the development of the 5th generation Eveready Dolphin Torch. It is probably the earliest 3D printed object in the Museum’s collection. The Dolphin torch has been revitalised a number of times in its 40 year life. The most recent versions of the torch (Mark 4 and 5) were created by Design Resource for the US-based Energizer company. Design Resource has been creating products for Energizer and its form...

Summary

Object No.

2006/52/3

Object Statement

Prototype torch body, Eveready 'Dolphin', nylon, designed and made by Design Resource Australia Pty Ltd, Crows Nest, New South Wales, Australia, 2001

Physical Description

Cream-coloured plastic body for torch (flashlight) open at one end with blue square of foam inside.

Marks

no marks

Dimensions

Height

140 mm

Width

140 mm

Depth

120 mm

Production

Notes

This prototype was designed by Design Resource Australia Pty Ltd in Crows Nest NSW Australia in 2001. It was made from nylon using a rapid prototyping technique called Selective Laser Sintering (SLS).

Selective Laser Sintering builds plastic parts or objects a layer at a time by tracing a laser beam on the surface of a tightly compacted bed of powdered thermoplastic material. Heat from the laser melts the powder and bonds it together to form a layer of the object. The entire bed of powder is moved down one layer thickness and a new layer of powder spread over the surface. The laser is then applied again to create the next layer. This process is repeated until the entire object is fabricated. After the object is fully formed the excess powder is simply brushed away and some final manual finishing may be carried out.

Design Resource Australia Pty Ltd was asked by their client Eveready to redesign the old Dolphin lantern. Eveready wanted the new torch to look modern and stylish with extra features to make it appeal to customers.

The designers researched the other torches on the market to find out what the competition was like. The group of designers brainstormed creative ideas for how the new torch could look and work. The client, Eveready, helped to pick the design it thought would appeal most to customers. It was the design by Angelo Kotsis that was chosen to develop into a real torch.

Then Angelo and the team had to work out how to construct the new torch. They worked with engineers and manufacturers to test and develop the design using models and prototypes until the new torch was complete. The Dolphin was in production in 2003 and for sale soon afterwards.

There were some design criteria specified by the client that Angelo and the designers had to consider. They had to make sure the new torch:
- could be used with existing types of batteries
- could use a particular type of lamp
- included a stand (this was a new aspect they had to design into the torch).

History

Notes

This prototype was lent to the Museum for display in the exhibition 'Sydney designers unplugged: people, process, product' from 6 August to 9 October 2005 and subsequently donated to the Museum. It was originally used by the designers to evaluate the design of the Dolphin torch Mk 5, for example in a drop test.

The Dolphin torch has been revitalised a number of times in its 40 year life. The most recent versions of the torch (Mark 4 and 5) were created by Design Resource for the US-based Energizer company. Design Resource has been creating products for Energizer and its former subsidiary Eveready since 1989.

In 1966 Eveready in the USA designed and manufactured the first Dolphin torch - a large torch for world sales. It did well, but in 1973 Eveready's Australian arm redesigned the torch for Australian conditions, using an Australian design company. The new torch had to be shock resistant and waterproof. The designer Paul Cockburn of Design Field in Sydney insisted that it should be fairly ugly because he believed that many people would see this as a sign of ruggedness and reliability. He also wanted the torch to be multi functional, so he gave it an angled head that threw light down onto the path ahead or up when placed on the ground, useful when you're changing tyres in the dark. From 1978 until 1989 Cockburn's Dolphin Mark II was the best selling torch in the world. Another redesign in 1989, again by Cockburn, created the even uglier, high-tech styled Dolphin Mark III.

The Dolphin torch Mark 5 received an Australian Design Mark and Powerhouse Museum Selection Award in 2003. Over 100 products were entered in the 2003 Australian Design Awards and 68 of these were selected as finalists. Five judging panels (in the categories of furniture design, engineering design, industrial design, textile design, and software and electronics design) recommended 56 of the finalists for a Design Mark and 25 of these for a Design Award. The products receiving Design Awards were announced at a presentation night on 9 May 2003 at the Melbourne Town Hall. At this function, the Museum's Director (Dr. Kevin Fewster), announced the recipients of the Powerhouse Museum Selection awards for 2003.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Design Resource Australia Pty Ltd, 2006

Acquisition Date

10 April 2006

Cite this Object

Harvard

Prototype of 5th generation 'Dolphin' torch body 2019, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 23 August 2019, <https://ma.as/357172>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/357172 |title=Prototype of 5th generation 'Dolphin' torch body |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=23 August 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

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