Juicing cone prototype for Breville 800 Class Citrus Press

Made by Breville Design in Botany, New South Wales, Australia, 2003.

This prototype for a citrus press is an example of one of many rapid prototyping techniques that have become widely used by product designers all over the world. Rapid prototyping enables designers to quickly test and refine their ideas in three dimensions before they are presented to the tool maker or manufacturer. This prototype was used by the designer at Breville to juice citrus fruit in a working prototype and determine the optimum shape for the reamer. 3D computer data was used to make mor...

Summary

2006/16/5
Prototype, Breville 800 Class Citrus Press, plastic / Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene, designed and made by Breville Design - Housewares International, Botany, New South Wales, Australia, 2003

A white plastic prototype of the juicing cone or reamer for the Breville Citrus Press made from ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene) using a fused deposition modelling (FDM) rapid prototyping machine.

Dimensions

80 mm

Production

This plastic prototype of the juicing cone or reamer for the Breville Citrus Press was designed by Keith Hensel using 3D computer modelling and made using the fused deposition modelling (FDM) rapid prototyping machine in the Breville Design Studio at Botany, NSW, Australia, in October-December 2003. It was used by the designer to juice citrus fruit in a working prototype to test the optimum shape for the reamer. The designer modified this original prototype by hand. The modified shape was then digitally scanned back into the 3D computer model to complete the design.

The Citrus Press project was initiated by John O'Brien, the late chairman of Breville and son of the company's founder, Bill O'Brien. John O'Brien identified a need in the marketplace for a citrus juicer that was easy to use. The existing models required a significant amount of force and dexterity to operate.

The Breville Citrus Press was modelled and tested using a combination of 3D computer modelling, sketching and hand-made models. Keith Hensel used sketching to develop initial concepts for the form of the product and the patented handle mechanism. Simple cardboard cut-outs were also used to test the handle mechanism. 3D CAD modelling was used to further develop all aspects of the device. An early form model was hand-made in wood, and the first working prototype was also hand-made using wood and other components.

The 3D computer data was used to make more than 20 prototypes of the juicing cone or reamer. These were tested and modified by hand to obtain the perfect shape for juicing all types of citrus fruit. Each prototype was made overnight in a fused deposition modelling (FDM) rapid prototyping machine in the Breville design studio, ready for the designer to test and modify the next day.

Designers at Housewares International create all their products using 3D computer modelling. Products are designed in 3D on computer, and the data sent to a prototyping machine to produce a one-off for testing. Once the design is finalised the 3D data is sent to the toolmaker and manufacturer for testing and production.
Breville Design 2003
Breville Design

Source

Gift of Breville Design - Housewares International, 2006
18 January, 2006

Cite this Object

Juicing cone prototype for Breville 800 Class Citrus Press 2016, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 23 September 2017, <https://ma.as/356981>
{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/356981 |title=Juicing cone prototype for Breville 800 Class Citrus Press |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=23 September 2017 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}
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