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The Gestetner machine made in England c.1920

Made in United Kingdom, c 1920.

David Gestetner (1854-1939) patented the Cyclostyle pen in London in 1881. This was the first step in the introduction of stencil duplicating as a practicable process, replacing carbon paper. Another major step forward was the invention of the Rotary Cyclostyle in 1901. Succeeding machines became more sophisticated devices such as automatic feed (from 1905) and electric drive. Small business used Gestetners for internal memos and they were also used in schools, being favoured over the spirit dup...

Summary

Object No.

2005/169/1

Object Statement

Printing machine, 'The Gestetner', metal / wood, made by Gestetner Limited, United Kingdom, c. 1920

Physical Description

Printing machine, 'The Gestetner', metal / wood, made by Gestetner Limited, United Kingdom, c. 1920

Black metal base on which the operating mechanism is mounted. This consists of a series of rollers which deliver the ink to a special Japanese paper stencil which is attached to a revolving plate and is hand operated. A black case which locks into the base covers the unit.

Marks

Name: 'The Gestetner' and number '17882' on plates on one side inside the machine.

Production

Notes

David Gestetner (1854-1939) was born in Hungary and patented the Cyclostyle pen in London in 1881. This was the first step in the introduction of stencil duplicating as a practicable process. Another major step forward was the invention of the Rotary Cyclostyle in 1901. Succeeding machines became more sophisticated devices such as automatic feed (from1905) and electric drive. This particular model was capable of reproducing 40-50 copies per minute which dramatically increased the number of exact copies available. Gestetner is today a world-wide organisation specialising in offset rotary printers.

Made

United Kingdom c 1920

History

Notes

Gestetner machines provided a speedy and easy means of duplicating information and could do many more copies than carbon paper. These machines became workhorses for small business from the 1920s until plain paper photocopiers largely replaced them from the 1960s.

Gestetners were sold in NSW through agents from 1922-1927 until Gestetner opened its own office in Sydney in 1927.

Source

Credit Line

Source unknown

Acquisition Date

4 July 2005

Cite this Object

Harvard

The Gestetner machine made in England c.1920 2018, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 23 July 2019, <https://ma.as/353608>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/353608 |title=The Gestetner machine made in England c.1920 |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=23 July 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.

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