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2005/130/1 Evening dress and packaging, womens, polyester / plastic, designed by Yoshiki Hishinuma, Tokyo, Japan, 2000. Click to enlarge.

Evening dress and packaging designed by Yoshiki Hishinuma

Designed
The application of traditional Japanese techniques within a technologically advanced textile industry has made for some of the most innovative fashion in Japan. When shibori, a resist dye technique practiced in Japan for centuries, is used on polyester under heat, textile artists and fashion designers can permanently texture the fabric or create three-dimensional effects. High heat is used in place of dye to set the shaped pattern.

A wooden mold shaped like a propeller was made by Hishinuma …

Summary

Object No.

2005/130/1

Object Statement

Evening dress and packaging, womens, polyester / plastic, designed by Yoshiki Hishinuma, Tokyo, Japan, 2000

Physical Description

Consists of a short-sleeved evening dress made with white heat-treated polyester. The dress has 'extension' panels that give the garment a three-dimensional quality. The dress, designed by Yoshiki Hishinuma, was created using 'shibori', a resist dye technique which, when used on polyester under heat, can permanently texture the fabric or create three-dimensional effects. High heat is used in place of dye to set the shaped pattern. Comes complete with clear plastic bag with the text 'Yoshiki Hishinuma' printed in black.

Production

Notes

The dress, designed by Yoshiki Hishinuma, was created using 'shibori', a resist dye technique practiced in Japan for centuries. When used on polyester under heat, textile artists and fashion designers can permanently texture the fabric or create three-dimensional effects. High heat is used in place of dye to set the shaped pattern. A wooden mould shaped like a propeller was made by Hishinuma to permanently imprint three dimensional shapes with heat by laying the constructed dress over the mould, tying it down tightly and securely, and then boiling the garment to activate the shrinking of the exposed parts. Working closely with a textile engineer an a yarn twister, a polyester fabric was developed that stretched and pulled under high heat. The result is a 'scultured' dress with panniers that seemingly float from the wearer's body. The finished garment does not require the usual cutting and darting to fit the shape of the wearer as it simply stretches and hugs the body.

History

Notes

The dress is part of the Hishinuma archives and has been presented to the Museum for display in the exhibition 'The Cutting Edge: Fashion from Japan' in September 2005.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Yoshiki Hishinuma, 2005

Acquisition Date

22 May 2005

Cite this Object

Harvard

Evening dress and packaging designed by Yoshiki Hishinuma 2021, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 23 September 2021, <https://ma.as/351936>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/351936 |title=Evening dress and packaging designed by Yoshiki Hishinuma |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=23 September 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}