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2005/210/4 Wedding slipper shoes (pair), womens, silk / leather / cardboard, by Walter & Co, London, England, worn by Agnes Thompson, Bathurst, New South Wales, Australia, 1833. Click to enlarge.

Pair of womens wedding slipper shoes by Walter & Co

Made
These shoes form part of a collection of wedding attire, including shoes, dress and drawstring purses, which were worn by Agnes Thompson on her wedding to Dr George Busby, government medical officer at the Convict Hospital at Bathurst, on 11 January 1833.

At the time that Agnes Thompson married George Busby, weddings - and wedding dresses - were often quite simple with the intention that the dress and accessories would be used for 'best' for some years to come. The dress is typical of the …

Summary

Object No.

2005/210/4

Object Statement

Wedding slipper shoes (pair), womens, silk / leather / cardboard, by Walter & Co, London, England, worn by Agnes Thompson, Bathurst, New South Wales, Australia, 1833

Physical Description

Pair of square toed slip on shoes made of cream silk with thin brown leather soles. The shoes are decorated on the front with small cream braid bows.

Marks

Paper label glued to inside of one shoe with inscription 'IND WALTER & CO/LONDON' under a coat of arms with motto 'Honis soir qui mal y pense' (Evil be to him who evil thinks).

Dimensions

Width

60 mm

Depth

30 mm

Production

Notes

Manufactured in London by Walter & Co in 1833.

History

Notes

Shoemaking is an ancient craft. For centuries, people have worn coverings to protect their feet from heat, cold and other environmental hazards. But for almost as long, shoes have also been status symbols, reflecting the wearer's position in society and the attitudes of a culture or a time. A person wanting to buy shoes in the 1800s could get them direct from a shoemaker who worked alone or in a shared workshop with traditional tools and techniques. Factories were also producing ready-made shoes by hand, which could be bought from the premises or from warehouses or peddlers. Gradually, mechanisation took over from handwork and by the end of the century most shoes were machine-made in factories and sold through specialist shoe shops.

Shoes have become objects of beauty, rather than merely practical items. They are essential fashion accessories, with the change in vogue expressed through different toe shapes, heel heights, materials and decoration. Technical developments have accompanied many of these changes and, in some cases, made them possible.

These shoes were worn by Agnes Thompson on her wedding day, 11 January 1833. They were later possibly used by Agnes Thompson's daughter.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Kirsten Halley, Catriona Clifton-Bligh and Charles Alexander, 2005

Acquisition Date

13 October 2005

Cite this Object

Harvard

Pair of womens wedding slipper shoes by Walter & Co 2021, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 29 July 2021, <https://ma.as/350062>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/350062 |title=Pair of womens wedding slipper shoes by Walter & Co |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=29 July 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}