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10086-1 Botanical model, deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna), paint / papier-mache / wood, made by Auzoux, Paris, France, 1865-1885. Click to enlarge.

Botanical model of deadly nightshade

Made
In the second half of the nineteenth century interest in the anatomical structure of the animal and vegetable world increased markedly. This led to problems acquiring human bodies for educational purposes and zoological and botanical specimens from the more remote parts of the globe. As a result there was an increased demand for models which were structurally correct and robust enough to withstand the classroom environment.

Traditionally wax had been used to make models but wax models were …

Summary

Object No.

10086-1

Object Statement

Botanical model, deadly nightshade (Atropa belladonna), paint / papier-mache / wood, made by Auzoux, Paris, France, 1865-1885

Physical Description

Flower model of deadly nightshade mounted on a wooden, square stand. The flower comprises a thick stem with dark green leaves, which are oval in shape, and pointed at the tips. The flower itself has a green bottom which merges into a purple middle and top with five large removable teeth or lobes, showing the prominent veins of the walls of the flower, which also appear on the leaves. In the centre of the flower are the buds of the berries, green in colour, and the stigma.

Production

Notes

This model was made in Paris, France around 1875-1885.

History

Notes

This botanical model was purchased from Dr Louis Auzoux in Paris, France.

Cite this Object

Harvard

Botanical model of deadly nightshade 2021, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 14 May 2021, <https://ma.as/349298>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/349298 |title=Botanical model of deadly nightshade |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=14 May 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}