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2004/136/5 Sarkoy kilim, wool, tapestry weave, Thrace, Western Turkey, 1880-1910. Click to enlarge.

Sarkoy kilim from western Turkey

Made
This subtly-toned Sarkoy kilim is from the Balkan region of Thrace in Western Turkey, an area which has produced pile carpets and many kinds of flatweaves for centuries. The name 'Sarkoy', when applied to kilims, refers to a Serbian town on the Bulgarian border (now called Pirot) which has a documented tradition of kilim weaving. The kilim is tapestry woven, a weft-face weaving technique in which the dyed wefts are discontinuous, ie they do not extend from selvedge to selvedge but are inserted …

Summary

Object No.

2004/136/5

Object Statement

Sarkoy kilim, wool, tapestry weave, Thrace, Western Turkey, 1880-1910

Physical Description

A rectangular flatweave rug (kilim), tapestry woven with wool on woollen warps. The kilim has a strong geometric pattern predominantly made up of triangles, with three large diamonds in the field delineated through the use of colour. At either end of the field is a deep zig-zag patterned band, while triangles set point to point form the four borders. The ends of the kilim are gently scalloped and the fringe is the knotted wool warp. The palette, made up of light blue, dark blue, mustard and yellow, is soft and subdued.

Dimensions

Width

1080 mm

Production

Made

Made

Notes

Kilims are flatweave rugs which can be made using several different weaving techniques. This Sarkoy kilim is tapestry woven, in which the dyed wefts are discontinuous, ie they do not extend from selvedge to selvedge but are inserted in blocks of colour to form the design. The wefts meet and separate at colour junctions and, in Sarkoy kilims like this one, slits between the colours are avoided by using a substantial number of diagonal lines. The name 'Sarkoy', when applied to kilims, refers to a Serbian town on the Bulgarian border (now called Pirot) which has a documented tradition of kilim weaving.

Wool is used for both warp and weft. Kilims use less material to make than pile rugs and are usually quicker to produce and less costly. They were generally made as utilitarian floor coverings, bag, trappings and draperies.

History

Notes

The kilim comes from the private collection of the donor, Dr George Soutter and was given to the Museum as part of a collection of eight rugs and nomadic trappings representing the main carpet-producing regions - ie from Western Turkey through Iran into Central Asia.

Dr Soutter's gift emphasises the significance of the Museum's rug collection and was designed to encourage its growth, as well as to acknowledge the achievements of the Oriental Rug Society of NSW, an affiliated society of the Museum. The collection documents many of the purposes for which rugs and trappings are made, including floor coverings and tent partitions.

Source

Credit Line

Donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program by Dr George Soutter, 2004

Acquisition Date

8 October 2004

Cite this Object

Harvard

Sarkoy kilim from western Turkey 2021, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 27 October 2021, <https://ma.as/348175>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/348175 |title=Sarkoy kilim from western Turkey |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=27 October 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}