A Kolibri pocket camera made by Zeiss Ikon

Made by Zeiss Ikon in Germany, 1930-1935.

35 mm film was first introduced for Edison’s Kinetograph film but was not of sufficient quality for still film until the early 1900s. Another factor which limited the uptake of 35 mm film was the competition from Kodak’s multitude of film sizes. It was not until the 1930’s that this smaller film size started to become popular and it was from this time that 35mm cameras began to dominate the market.

A number of camera manufacturers had attempted to market the format but it was not until 1923 an...

Summary

Object No.

2004/44/8-2

Physical Description

Pocket camera, 'Kolibri', metal / plastic / glass / leather, made by Zeiss Ikon, Germany, 1930-1935

Pocket camera is made of metal covered and with black leather. Used 127 rollifilm to produce a miniature format negative. The collapsing lens is a 50mm Tessar with various dials and scales printed around it. The dual view finder flips up from the top of the camera and the hinged back opens to reveal the film chamber.

Marks

Front: 'Kolibri', back: 'ZEISS/IKON', around lens: 'Zeiss-Ikon COMPUR', 'Carl Zeiss Jena Nr. 1241345 Tessar 1:3,5 f=5cm'.

Dimensions

Height

67 mm

Width

112 mm

Depth

50 mm

Production

Notes

The Kolibri was produced and manufactured by Zeiss Ikon between 1930 and 1935. It falls into the class known as 'Vest Pocket' cameras which were popular in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Whereas most of the other Vest Pocket cameras were folding the Kolibri was an extending type. The lens and shutter were connected to the camera body by an extendable tube rather than leather bellows.

http://www.amdmacpherson.com/classiccameras/index.html

Made

Zeiss Ikon 1930-1935

Cite this Object

Harvard

A Kolibri pocket camera made by Zeiss Ikon 2018, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 16 October 2018, <https://ma.as/346038>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/346038 |title=A Kolibri pocket camera made by Zeiss Ikon |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=16 October 2018 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

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