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2004/44/8-2 Pocket camera, part of collection 'Kolibri', metal / plastic / glass / leather, Zeiss Ikon, Germany, 1930-1935. Click to enlarge.

A Kolibri pocket camera made by Zeiss Ikon

Made
35 mm film was first introduced for Edison's Kinetograph film but was not of sufficient quality for still film until the early 1900s. Another factor which limited the uptake of 35 mm film was the competition from Kodak's multitude of film sizes. It was not until the 1930's that this smaller film size started to become popular and it was from this time that 35mm cameras began to dominate the market.

A number of camera manufacturers had attempted to market the format but it was not until 1923 and the introduction of the 'Leica' camera that 35 mm challenged other larger film sizes. This success was due to the high design, construction and lens qualities of the 'Leica' which allowed quality enlargements to be made from the small 35 mm negatives. In 1934 Kodak produced its first 35 mm camera, the 'Retina' and in 1936 the International Radio Corporation made the 'Argus model A' camera the first to be mass-produced in the U. S. A. After the Second World War Japanese manufactures started producing quality 35 mm cameras which became the de-facto standard for film negatives throughout the rest of the century.

The Kolibri was produced and manufactured by Zeiss Ikon between 1930 and 1935 and falls into the class known as 'Vest Pocket' cameras which were popular in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Whereas most of the other Vest Pocket cameras were folding the Kolibri was an extending type. The lens and shutter were connected to the camera body by an extendable tube rather than leather bellows.

This camera is a part of the Jock Leate collection acquired by the Powerhouse in 2004. Jock managed a chain of 'photography, recording, Hi-Fi and optical equipment' stores across Sydney from the late 1960s to 1988. The collection spans the period from the 1870s through to the 1980s.

References
Coe, Brian, Cameras, from the daguerreotype to instant pictures, Marshall Cavendish, London, 1978

Geoff Barker, March, 2007

Summary

Object No.

2004/44/8-2

Object Statement

Pocket camera, part of collection 'Kolibri', metal / plastic / glass / leather, Zeiss Ikon, Germany, 1930-1935

Physical Description

Pocket camera, 'Kolibri', metal / plastic / glass / leather, made by Zeiss Ikon, Germany, 1930-1935

Pocket camera is made of metal covered and with black leather. Used 127 rollifilm to produce a miniature format negative. The collapsing lens is a 50mm Tessar with various dials and scales printed around it. The dual view finder flips up from the top of the camera and the hinged back opens to reveal the film chamber.

Marks

Front: 'Kolibri', back: 'ZEISS/IKON', around lens: 'Zeiss-Ikon COMPUR', 'Carl Zeiss Jena Nr. 1241345 Tessar 1:3,5 f=5cm'.

Dimensions

Height

67 mm

Width

112 mm

Depth

50 mm

Production

Made

Notes

The Kolibri was produced and manufactured by Zeiss Ikon between 1930 and 1935. It falls into the class known as 'Vest Pocket' cameras which were popular in the late 1920s and early 1930s. Whereas most of the other Vest Pocket cameras were folding the Kolibri was an extending type. The lens and shutter were connected to the camera body by an extendable tube rather than leather bellows.

http://www.amdmacpherson.com/classiccameras/index.html

Cite this Object

Harvard

A Kolibri pocket camera made by Zeiss Ikon 2020, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 2 March 2021, <https://ma.as/346038>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/346038 |title=A Kolibri pocket camera made by Zeiss Ikon |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=2 March 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}