Magazine, ‘Oz’, No. 46, January/February 1973, colour offset lithography on paper, cover by Ken Pereiny, published by OZ Publications Ink Ltd, London, England, 1973

This is the second last issue of Oz magazine, an outrageous satirical magazine (published Sydney and London 1963-1979) which shocked England and Australia in the 1960s.

The magazine began life in Sydney with Richard Neville and Richard Walsh as editors and renowned Australian designer Martin Sharp doing many of the graphics. The first issue hit the streets of Sydney on April Fool’s Day 1963.
London Oz (established February 1967) was a much better-produced and altogether more colourful publicat...

Summary

2004/93/4
Magazine titled 'Oz', price 25p, with a paper cover decorated with a colour drawing of a figure, naked from the waist down, with a platypus head, jumping away from a toilet bowl. The figure is wearing a hat, coat, one shoe and chains around the wrist and ankle. In the background is grass and vegetation. A bird's wing is protruding from the toilet bowl. The magazine consists of 48 pages and has a stapled spine. Inside the magazine are photographs, drawings, articles and advertisements in colour. The cover artist's name and magazine publication details are printed on the inside of the front cover.

Dimensions

285 mm
207 mm
2 mm

Production

The magazine was published by OZ Publications Ink Ltd, London, England in January/February 1973. The cover of the magazine was created by Ken Pereiny.
Pereiny, Ken
Oz Publications Ink Limited 1973

History

This is the second last issue of Oz magazine.

Oz (Sydney and London, 1963-1973) was a controversial magazine that shocked Sydney and London during the 1960s. It's larrikin attitude, which was very much in the tradition of the student newspapers where its founders had earlier forays into publishing, concentrated on social satire with humorous cartoons and other artistic material depicting politicians, royalty, and other public figures in an irreverent fashion. Although articles of more serious socio-political content were also featured, Oz's prominent anti-establisment profile made it a target for censorship. Australian Oz became a prominent casualty of the so-called 'Censorship Wars' with Issue no. 6 (Feb. 1964). Editors Richard Neville, Richard Walsh, and artist Martin Sharp, were charged under obscenity laws and found guilty under the Obscene and Indecent Publications Act and sentenced to jail terms with hard labour - a decision quashed on appeal. This controversy gained Martin Sharp a considerable public following, leading to his successful first one-man exhibition at the Clune Galleries in Sydney in 1965. 'Art for Mart's Sake' virtually sold out on the opening night thereby broadening the artist's horizons. After their experience of the first OZ trial, Neville and Sharp needed little encouragement to leave Australia for England where they launched London Oz in February 1967 (London Oz ceased publication in May 1973 after 47 UK editions). Like its Australian predecessor, London Oz also became the subject of an obsenity trial following the after publication of the controversial 'School Kids Issue' in 1970.

The vendor has been a collector of posters and printed material in Paris and Sydney since the late 1960s.

Source

Purchased 2004
28 May, 2004

Cite this Object

Magazine, 'Oz', No. 46, January/February 1973, colour offset lithography on paper, cover by Ken Pereiny, published by OZ Publications Ink Ltd, London, England, 1973 2016, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 22 October 2017, <https://ma.as/345033>
{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/345033 |title=Magazine, 'Oz', No. 46, January/February 1973, colour offset lithography on paper, cover by Ken Pereiny, published by OZ Publications Ink Ltd, London, England, 1973 |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=22 October 2017 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}
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