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2004/15/2 Carved animal, 'Walawuru Wedge-tailed Eagle' Tjulpu (bird), river red gum, Pulya Taylor, Maruku Arts, Uluru, Northern Territory, Australia, 1999. Click to enlarge.

Carved river red gum ‘Walawuru Wedge-tailed Eagle’ Tjulpu by Pulya Taylor

Artist
This collection of carved animals from Uluru in the Northern Territory are a significant addition to the Indigenous collection. The Museum has a limited number of objects in the collection from the Mutitjulu community. All three of the artists are senior custodians in the community, with Topsy and Pulya being founding members of the Maruku Arts centre.

Contemporary carvings by Anangu (Central and Western Desert Aboriginal people) are known as punu, hand carved and decorated with walka, patterns burnt into the wood with wire heated on a wood fire. The animals all have their associations with the Tjukurpa, the stories of the Creation Ancestors and the activities which shaped the land, the people and their Law.

Tjukurpa is celebrated in inma (ceremony, song and dance), story telling and art work. Many of the details of Tjukurpa are restricted to senior custodians.

Summary

Object No.

2004/15/2

Object Statement

Carved animal, 'Walawuru Wedge-tailed Eagle' Tjulpu (bird), river red gum, Pulya Taylor, Maruku Arts, Uluru, Northern Territory, Australia, 1999

Physical Description

Carved animal, 'Walawuru Wedge-tailed Eagle' Tjulpu (bird) , river red gum, Pulya Taylor, Maruku Arts, Uluru, Northern Territory, Australia, 1999

Carved wooden 'Walawuru Wedge-tailed Eagle' Tjulpu (bird) made of river red gum. The bird sits on two small legs with a flat top and its head is turned upwards facing the sky. The upperside of the bird form has been decorated using pokerwork. This decoration includes feathers and facial features.

Marks

Burnt into underside of object "1" within a circle. Inscribed onto underside of object in green pencil "WH182"

Dimensions

Height

160 mm

Width

180 mm

Production

Notes

Pulya Taylor was born and grew up around Walytjatjata in the south west corner of the Northern Territory. She began working in arts and crafts at Ernabella community in the late forties and, with her late husband and carving partner, helped establish Maruku Arts, of which she is still an executive member. Pulya's work has been exhibited widely and is represented in Australian and international collections. She is one of the few artists who signs her work and uses a circular walka and line on the base of each carving.

Although the majority of animals carved on the lands are lizards some Anangu are increasingly specialising in stylised tjulpu tjuta or birds.

Source

Credit Line

Purchased 2004

Acquisition Date

10 February 2004

Cite this Object

Harvard

Carved river red gum 'Walawuru Wedge-tailed Eagle' Tjulpu by Pulya Taylor 2020, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 19 October 2020, <https://ma.as/343973>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/343973 |title=Carved river red gum 'Walawuru Wedge-tailed Eagle' Tjulpu by Pulya Taylor |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=19 October 2020 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}