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2010/5/1 Mural painting, 'Zheng He and Columbus', acrylic on medium density fibre board (MDF), painted by Guan Wei for the exhibition, 'Other histories:Guan Wei's fable for a contemporary world', Powerhouse Museum, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2006-2007. Click to enlarge.

Mural, ‘Zheng He and Columbus’ by Guan Wei

Made 2006-2007

The name ‘Shou Lao’ originally comes from ‘Lao Shou Xing’. In East Asia, the canopus was believed to be the Star of Longevity ?Lao Shou Xing?. It was believed that this star came down to the earth and became the God of Longevity, Shou Lao.
The canopus or ?Star of Longevity’ can be seen in the southern hemisphere and rarely appear in the northern hemisphere. It was believed that seeing this star was regarded auspicious and would bring longevity to the person. Also it was believed that appearing ...

Summary

Object No.

2010/5/1

Object Statement

Mural painting, 'Zheng He and Columbus', acrylic on medium density fibre board (MDF), painted by Guan Wei for the exhibition, 'Other histories:Guan Wei's fable for a contemporary world', Powerhouse Museum, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2006-2007

Physical Description

Mural painting, 'Zheng He and Columbus', acrylic on medium density fibre board (MDF), painted by Guan Wei for the exhibition, 'Other histories:Guan Wei's fable for a contemporary world', Powerhouse Museum, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2006-2007

A mural depicting a section of the globe and constellation against a black background. This mural was painted in two parts on medium density fibre (MDF) board and needs to be displayed together. Two expeditionary ships are at the centre, the small boat symbolising the ship of Christopher Columbus (1451-1506) and the larger boat symbolising the ship of Zheng He (1371-1432). A hand and red arrow point to the left. The painting includes many human figures and a mysterious animal.

This particular mural painting was displayed at the beginning of the exhibition as an introduction and shows discovery stories of Australia both by Zheng He(1371-1432) from the East and Christopher Columbus (1451-1506) from the West. It depicts constellations with a mysterious animal which allude to the Chinese percept of the connection between the Star of Longevity (Lao Shou Xing) and the Museum's object, the God of Longevity figurine (Shou Lao). In East Asia, the Canopus was believed to be the Star of Longevity. It was believed that this star came down to the earth and became the God of Longevity.

Dimensions

Height

2000 mm

Width

3700 mm

Depth

18 mm

Production

Notes

Guan Wei was born in Beijing in 1957 and graduated in Fine Arts from Beijing Capital University in 1986. He migrated to Australia in 1990 and currently lives and works in Sydney. Since his first visit, as artiest-in-residence at the Tasmanian School of Art in 1989, Guan Wei has been fascinated by narratives that connect China and Australia. Guan Wei's art is imbued with wit, humour and a social conscience. It is inspired by themes such as exploration, immigration, the plight of refugees, secret histories and cross-cultural understanding.

Made

2006-2007

History

Notes

This was one of a series of mural paintings in an exhibition "Other histories: Guan Wei's fable for a contemporary world" held at the Powerhouse Museum from October 2006 to April 2007. Guan Wei's mural paintings were ephemeral and the walls were over-painted and returned to a state of nothingness after the exhibition. However, this particular work was saved as the wall ti was painted on was temporary and could removed from the gallery, and was donated to the museum by Guan Wei under the Cultural Gifts Program.

Source

Credit Line

Donated through the Australian Government's Cultural Gifts Program by Guan Wei, 2010

Acquisition Date

25 February 2010

Cite this Object

Harvard

Mural, 'Zheng He and Columbus' by Guan Wei 2018, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 19 October 2019, <https://ma.as/331336>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/331336 |title=Mural, 'Zheng He and Columbus' by Guan Wei |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=19 October 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

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