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2004/6/1 Double bass, timber / metal, designed and made by Herbert Edwin Lansdown, Lismore, New South Wales, Australia, 1927. Click to enlarge.

Double bass, timber / metal, designed and made by Herbert Edwin Lansdown, Lismore, New South Wales, Australia, 1927

Made by Lansdown, Herbert Edwin in Lismore, New South Wales, 1927.

Australia has had over four hundred makers of bowed string instruments. Many of these were amateur makers such as Herbert Edwin Lansdown (1868-1952). He is known to have made several instruments using Australian timbers and this instrument, a double bass dating from 1927, is made from Australian cedar. Lansdown is just one of at least seven makers who have worked in the upper north coast region of New South Wales prior to WW2. Most of these makers appear to have been amateurs but took advantage ...

Summary

Object No.

2004/6/1

Object Statement

Double bass, timber / metal, designed and made by Herbert Edwin Lansdown, Lismore, New South Wales, Australia, 1927

Physical Description

Double bass, timber / metal, designed and made by Herbert Edwin Lansdown, Lismore, New South Wales, Australia, 1927.

Acoustic double bass of irregular shape - the upper bout and top corners being much narrower than the shape of a regular instrument. The body is made from Australian cedar, dark brown in colour. The F holes are coarsely carved. The scroll is also irregularly carved. There are four strings and a large carved wooden bridge. The bridge of light brown timber and tailpiece are probably not original. The endpin is made of a broomstick with a metal end. There are two old badly done repairs of the join at the back of instrument where the back meets the side at the bottom. One repair has another strip of wood nailed on to it, the other done with a thick application of glue, possibly Araldite or similar. The repairs are not visible from the front.

Dimensions

Height

1870 mm

Width

640 mm

Depth

420 mm

Production

Notes

The bass was designed by Herbert Edwin Lansdown. The bass was made by Herbert Edwin Lansdown in 1927 at Lismore.

History

Notes

The bass is said to have been made by HE Lansdown for an amateur orchestra in Lismore of which he was a member (Ray Holliday/David Potts). The orchestra was not able to afford or have access to professionally made instruments. The bass was bought by David Potts from Cedric Ashton in 1992. Ashton used it for teaching purposes. Unknown when or how he acquired it.

Source

Credit Line

Purchased 2004

Acquisition Date

15 January 2004

Cite this Object

Harvard

Double bass, timber / metal, designed and made by Herbert Edwin Lansdown, Lismore, New South Wales, Australia, 1927 2018, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 23 May 2019, <https://ma.as/319872>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/319872 |title=Double bass, timber / metal, designed and made by Herbert Edwin Lansdown, Lismore, New South Wales, Australia, 1927 |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=23 May 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

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