We acknowledge Australia’s First Nations Peoples as the Traditional Owners and Custodians of the land and give respect to Elders – past and present – and through them to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
85/1286-239 Glass plate negative, full plate, 'Grazing sheep', unattributed studio, Sydney, Australia, c. 1880-1920. Click to enlarge.

'Grazing sheep' glass plate negative

Made
Soil erosion is a natural occurrence in Australia as soil is moved constantly by wind and water. Living tree roots can stabilise soil particles by binding them tightly but, when trees die, the soil becomes susceptible to erosion.

Nearly every tree on the hills in this photo is dead, probably ringbarked. Ringbarking involves cutting a ring of bark from around the trunk, which stops the flow of vital nutrients to all parts of the tree. It was a cheap and effective method of clearing land and …

Summary

Object No.

85/1286-239

Object Statement

Glass plate negative, full plate, 'Grazing sheep', unattributed studio, Sydney, Australia, c. 1880-1920

Physical Description

Glass negative, full plate, 'Grazing sheep', unattributed studio, Sydney, Australia, c. 1880-1920.

Silver gelatin dry plate glass negative in landscape format. The caption, studio number and studio mark are inscribed on the reverse of the negative.

The inscriptions have been scratched off this neagtive. 'Kerry Photo Sydney' is still legible, however this may be an incorret attribution.

This negative is not fully catalogued.

12/60 Tyrrell Inventory Number, 1750 Unattributed Studio Number

Dimensions

Width

215 mm

Production

Made

Notes

This negative is not attributed to a particular studio. The Tyrrell Collection of glass plate negatives dates from approximately 1880 to 1920.

Cite this Object

Harvard

'Grazing sheep' glass plate negative 2021, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 6 May 2021, <https://ma.as/31950>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/31950 |title='Grazing sheep' glass plate negative |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=6 May 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}