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2010/54/1 Protest costume, 'Greedozer II', mixed materials, designed and made by Benny Zable, Nimbin, New South Wales, Australia, 1980. Click to enlarge.

‘Greedozer II’ protest costume by Benny Zable

Made by Zable, Benny in Nimbin, New South Wales, Australia, 1980.

Benny Zable has been involved in protests since the early 1970s, and he appears in video footage of one of Australia’s most significant environmental protests, the fight to stop the damming of Tasmania’s Franklin River. This environmental issue became an election issue and saw the beginning of the first green party in the world.

Benny Zable uses theatre and mime to convey his anti-development messages and created this costume over a number of protests. Non-violent protest has empowered ordinar...

Summary

Object No.

2010/54/1

Object Statement

Protest costume, 'Greedozer II', mixed materials, designed and made by Benny Zable, Nimbin, New South Wales, Australia, 1980

Physical Description

Protest costume, 'Greedozer II', mixed materials, designed and made by Benny Zable, Nimbin, New South Wales, Australia, 1980

Protest costume made from a long strip of black cotton with a hole cut for the head and neck and fastened together at the sides with ties. The front of the costume bears the stencilled text 'Greedozer and Company, Work, Consume, Be Silent, Die, I rely on your apathy, It's costing the earth' in gold, white and pink. The text 'Ecological destruction, Eroding our future' is painted on the back of the suit in white and pink. A small green metal badge with the text, 'Work, buy, consume, die' is also attached to the back of the suit. The face mask is made from a World War II gas mask and is painted white with a piece of black paisley fabric to cover the head of the wearer. The mask's filter features a black handprint painted on a red and yellow radioactive symbol. A second gas mask filter features a map painted in white against a blue sea.

Dimensions

Height

1420 mm

Width

550 mm

Production

Notes

The 'Greedozer II' protest costume was designed and made by Benny Zable in Nimbin, New South Wales, Australia, 1980.

History

Notes

The suit was used by Benny Zable at a wide range of environmental and peace protests around Australia between 1980 and 2001.

The following is an excerpt from an interview with Benny Zable, March 2001 by curator Anni Turnbull.

BZ: "The idea for the suit came up through a vision while I was meditating. Where to go from here. This greed dozer, all these monsters. I was sitting right in silence there amongst all these dead trees, the trees they had knocked down. One of the last coastal rain forests. I was sitting there seeing all the life in disarray around me. I saw this monster thing moving, in the dredge moving along. Greeddozer came into my consciousness. So I formed the suit out of black plastic and cardboard, recycled for this theatre"

AT: "What about the phrase 'Consume, be silent, and die?"

BZ That came out of graffiti I saw on the walls in South Australia. 'I rely on your apathy' was something that was tagged to Bjelke Peterson that I saw on a poster. 'It's costing the earth' was something I made up."*

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Benny Zable, 2010

Acquisition Date

17 August 2010

Cite this Object

Harvard

'Greedozer II' protest costume by Benny Zable 2019, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 7 December 2019, <https://ma.as/319480>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/319480 |title='Greedozer II' protest costume by Benny Zable |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=7 December 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

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