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2007/52/1 Computer system, consisting of a Silicon Graphics IRIS (integrated raster imaging system) 2400T (turbo) and IRIS3020 with manuals and data cartridges, metal / glass / electronic components / plastic, designed and manufactured by Silicon Graphics, California, United States of America, 1983,. Click to enlarge.

Computers used to produce high end video effects and new compositing software for television

Made in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1983-1984.

The computers were used by the donors in the design and production of high end visual effects for commercials and television series. The computers were also used for the development of software to make this task easier, more flexible and in the creation of innovative effects - including the ‘Eddie’ software (specs by Chris Godfrey, code by Bruno Nicoletti).

Chris Godfrey and Zareh Nalbandian purchased the Sydney arm of the Video Paintbrush Co. in 1991 and Animal Logic was created. Animal Logic ...

Summary

Object No.

2007/52/1

Object Statement

Computer system, consisting of a Silicon Graphics IRIS (integrated raster imaging system) 2400T (turbo) and IRIS3020 with manuals and data cartridges, metal / glass / electronic components / plastic, designed and manufactured by Silicon Graphics, California, United States of America, 1983, used by Chris Godfrey and Zareh Nalbandian, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1983-1991

Physical Description

Computer system, consisting of a Silicon Graphics IRIS (integrated raster imaging system) 2400T (turbo) and IRIS3020 with manuals and data cartridges, metal / glass / electronic components / plastic, designed and manufactured by Silicon Graphics, California, United States of America, 1983, used by Chris Godfrey and Zareh Nalbandian, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1983-1991

Silicon Graphics 3020 grey metal case on casters; top left hand corner - cartridge drive; label SiG computer system IRIS (Integrated Raster Imaging System) 3020; on the back ventilation grill, reset button, DIB switches, scsi port socket x 4; DNC switches x 4; Ethernet sockets; power outlet. H=740mm W=450mm D=680mm.

Silicon Graphics 2400 grey metal box same as above except label - SiG IRIS 2400 turbo

SiG monitor x 2 (15 inch) grey plastic casing on plastic rotating stage; ventilation slots; all connector sockets in stand. H=490mm W=450mm D=530

SiG keyboards x 2 grey plastic casing, standard keyboard and number pad, cable 25 pin connector. H=45m m W=485mm D=220

Mice - SiG x 1 & Hawley X063X x 1 - SiG 3 button with SiG logo in grey plastic casing, 9 pin connector, 850mm cable. H=30mm W= 65mm D=100mm

Hawley mouse in grey plastic case, 3 black buttons, 9 pin connector. H=30mm W= 55mm D=80mm

Optical mouse pad

87 x data cartridges

Manuals: 4 x 'overview preview' manuals by 'Wave front Technology' + extra pages for 'overview'. 11 x SiG 'IRIS' manuals.

Production

Notes

The IRIS 2400T & 3020 computers were manufactured by Silicon Graphics Inc. in North America around 1983-4. These computers were designed for fast computations in the delivery of on-screen graphics. By the end of 1988 Silicon Graphics was positioning the 3000 series as 'mature' and ending the production of the 2000 series. These computers found applications in medical imaging, scientific visualisation and graphic animation.

History

Notes

These computers were used by Chris Godfrey and Zareh Nalbandian prior to being donated to the Museum. They were purchased new at enormous cost by the Video Paintbrush Co. in 1983-4. 'Wavefront' was the principle software used to render computer graphics. The computers were also used in the development of software to make this task easier, more flexible and in the creation of innovative effects - including the Eddie software (specs by Chris Godfrey, code by Bruno Nicoletti).

Animal Logic was created in May 1991 after Godfrey and Nalbandian purchased the Sydney arm of Video Paintbrush Co., relocated and renamed it. It has grown from an organisation of 18 employees in 1991 to over 560 employees in 2006.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Animal Logic, 2007

Acquisition Date

14 May 2007

Cite this Object

Harvard

Computers used to produce high end video effects and new compositing software for television 2018, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 17 June 2019, <https://ma.as/319003>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/319003 |title=Computers used to produce high end video effects and new compositing software for television |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=17 June 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

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