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K1192 Television receiver, electro-mechanical, 'The J L Baird Televisor', serial number 573, with photocopies of instruction booklet and price list, made by The Plessey Co Ltd, Ilford, Essex, England, for Baird International Television Ltd, 133 Long Acre, London, England, 1929-1933. Click to enlarge.

Baird 'Televisor' electro-mechanical television

Designed
This is a rare example of the first commercially available TV receiver, called the 'Televisor', developed by the famous Scottish inventor, John Logie Baird (1888-1946). From February 1930 TVs like this one in England received transmissions broadcast from the BBC. Less than 1,000 were made and this one is number 573. Baird's system used crude electro-mechanical spinning, perforated scanning discs to record and produce images.

Television relies on the fact that the human brain can convert a …

Summary

Object No.

K1192

Object Statement

Television receiver, electro-mechanical, 'The J L Baird Televisor', serial number 573, with photocopies of instruction booklet and price list, made by The Plessey Co Ltd, Ilford, Essex, England, for Baird International Television Ltd, 133 Long Acre, London, England, 1929-1933

Physical Description

Television receiver, electro-mechanical, 'The J L Baird Televisor', serial number 573, with photocopies of instruction booklet and price list, made by The Plessey Co Ltd, Ilford, Essex, England, for Baird International Television Ltd, 133 Long Acre, London, England, 1929-1933

The electro-mechanical television, the scanning disc and neon lamp are housed within a khaki brown painted metal case, set on a wooden base board with iron legs. The main body of the case is rectangular with rounded corners, a partial 'disk' of casing protrudes both top and bottom, the front face of the unit has a rectangular panel on the left side, slightly recessed with a centrally located Bakelite knob. A copper coloured metal plaque, bearing the manufacturer's name and the model name of the unit is located in the centre, there is a Bakelite knob at the base of the plaque, and to the right side is a small rectangular glass 'screen', deeply recessed into the case. On the back is a plaque bearing the manufacturers details and serial number of the object.

Photocopies of the instruction booklet for the Baird Televisor, 24 pages bound in a plastic ring binder, include the article "The origin and progress of Television".

Photocopies of the "Price list of Baird branded components" for the 'Televisor', 8 pages bound in a plastic ring binder.

Dimensions

Height

550 mm

Width

695 mm

Depth

320 mm

Production

Notes

James Logie Baird, (b.1888 Helensburg Scotland), was one of the best known pioneers of television in the United Kingdom. From 1923 he devoted his time to the development of the television and in 1925, gave a public demonstration at which crude images were transmitted betweeen two machines. The first emergence of the television from the laboratory is said to date from about 1929 when an agreement was made with the BBC and the Baird Television Co. for regular experimental transmissions of television pictures from its London station. These transmissions took place for half hour periods on five days of each week, and had a definition of 30 lines and a repetition frequency of 12.5 frames per second. The Baird Televisor, the first commercially available television receiver, was offered from February 1930, to receive these transmitions.

Source

Credit Line

Purchased 1984

Acquisition Date

31 May 1984

Cite this Object

Harvard

Baird 'Televisor' electro-mechanical television 2021, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 13 June 2021, <https://ma.as/260298>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/260298 |title=Baird 'Televisor' electro-mechanical television |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=13 June 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}