The Powerhouse acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of the ancestral homelands upon which our museums are situated. We respect their Elders, past, present and future and recognise their continuous connection to Country.
H9903 Sidereal regulator clock, wood / metal / glass, made by Charles Frodsham, London, England, 1835-1885, used at Sydney Observatory, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Click to enlarge.

Regulator clock by Charles Frodsham

Made
Charles Frodsham was born in 1810 and was the best known member of this family of watchmakers. He was renowned for the quality of his work and after his death in 1868 the company continued to produce quality clocks and watches well into the twentieth century.

After the death of John Roger Arnold in 1844, Charles Frodsham brought his business at 84 Strand, London. At first he signed his instruments 'J.R. Arnold - Chas Frodsham' but in 1857 he began working under his own name from the same …

Summary

Object No.

H9903

Object Statement

Sidereal regulator clock, wood / metal / glass, made by Charles Frodsham, London, England, 1835-1885, used at Sydney Observatory, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Physical Description

Sidereal regulator clock, wood / metal / glass, made by Charles Frodsham, London, England, 1835-1885, used at Sydney Observatory, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

A sidereal regulator clock consisting of a rectangular wooden long case with a hinged door at the front. A glass panel in the door allows a weighted pendulum to be seen. There is a large circular clock dial at the top of the case.The dial has one hand and is numbered from '5' to '60'. Two smaller dials are contained within the large dial. The upper dial is marked from '10' to '60' while the lower dial is marked from '0' to '23'. Both the smaller dials have one hand each. The clocks mechanism sits behind the clock dials.

Observatory Stock No. 987 Observatory stock number 30.

Dimensions

Height

1860 mm

Width

425 mm

Depth

260 mm

Production

Notes

The clock was made by Charles Frodsham, 84 The Strand, London, England between 1835 and 1885.

History

Notes

The clock was used at Sydney Observatory, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia as part of the radio time signal system and associated with electric panels on the west wall of the Transit Room of the Observatory. After the introduction of the Atomic Clock (H9898), the regulator clock was still maintained as a stand-by (blue file).
Observatory Stock Number 30 (blue file).

Cite this Object

Harvard

Regulator clock by Charles Frodsham 2022, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 7 February 2023, <https://ma.as/258835>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/258835 |title=Regulator clock by Charles Frodsham |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=7 February 2023 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.