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H7752 Temple bell, cast bronze, maker unknown, Tartar City, Peking, China, 1438 (Ming dynasty). Click to enlarge.

Chinese temple bell

Made in China, Asia, 1438.

This bronze temple bell which is 155cm height was made in Ming dynasty (1438) in China. Chinese inscription casted on the bell reads ?Cast on an auspicious day of the second month in the third year of Emperor Zhengtong’s reign of the Ming dynasty’. There are also four sections cast inscriptions which are from an ancient version of Buddhist sutra, which explains that the most essential emotion of the Buddhists should be patriotic.

“Huang Tu Yong Gu” (The territory of the emperor will remain stab...

Summary

Object No.

H7752

Object Statement

Temple bell, cast bronze, maker unknown, Tartar City, Peking, China, 1438 (Ming dynasty)

Physical Description

Large cast bronze bell, domed top, with double stapled handle on top for hanging. The bottom edge is scalloped. The handle is decorated with scrolling forms in heavy relief. The outside of the bell is broken up into panels by lines in relief. Five panels have Chinese characters within a rectangle surrounded by scrolling decoration and mounted on a pedestal shape.

Marks

Four panels of Chinese characters are from an ancient version of Buddhist sutra, which explains that the most essential emotion of the Buddhists should be patriotic.
"Huang Tu Yong Gu"
"Di Dao Xia Chang"
"Fa Lun Chang Zhuan"
"Fo Ri Zeng Hui"
There is also an inscription says ?Cast on an auspicious day of the second month in the third year of Emperor Zhengtong?s reign of the Ming Dynasty.?

There are four inscriptions 'NSW' and two water marks inside of the bell. It is possible that the water marks were created during the transportation from China to Australia.

Dimensions

Height

1545 mm

Width

960 mm

Weight

610 kg

Production

Notes

Reference:
http://foxuexinyin.blog.hexun.com/33247666_d.html
http://zhihuatemple.com/Temple/Tourguide/
http://bjmsg.focus.cn/msgview/313/34767149.html
http://www.oldbeijing.net/Article/Class1/Class33/6310.html
http://www.oldbeijing.org/dispbbs.asp?boardid=42&Id=41240&authorid=20127
http://bg.dltour.gov.cn/xg/travel_newsinfo.asp?NewsID=16741

Made

China, Asia 1438

History

Notes

Found by NSW Naval contingent during the Boxer rebellion in 1900. It was half buried in a Buddhist Temple in Tartar City, Peking.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Australian Museum, 1965

Acquisition Date

9 June 1965

Cite this Object

Harvard

Chinese temple bell 2019, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 17 July 2019, <https://ma.as/249120>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/249120 |title=Chinese temple bell |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=17 July 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}
This object is currently on display in Icons: From the MAAS Collection at the Powerhouse Museum.

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