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H5359 Teething ring with rattle, ivory / organic material / metal, maker unknown, place of production unknown, 19th century. Click to enlarge.

Babys teething ring and rattle

Made
  • 19th century
This is a combined baby's teething ring and rattle. In the Victorian period coral was traditionally used for babies to cut their teeth on. The smooth hardness of coral was said to be ideal for the purpose, though teething rings were also made of ivory, vegetable ivory (from Corozo nuts), amber and ebony. Teething rings were often combined with the baby's rattle, most elaborately hung with metal bells like this one. A cheaper version had a wooden handle with bells sewn onto leather strips.

Druitt, Silvia, "Antique Personal Possessions", Blandford Press, Poole, Dorset, England, 1980, p.116.

Margaret Simpson, Curator
September 2018

Summary

Object No.

H5359

Object Statement

Teething ring with rattle, ivory / organic material / metal, maker unknown, place of production unknown, 19th century

Physical Description

Baby's teething ring and rattle, [ivory], 1800s,

Dimensions

Height

125 mm

Width

53 mm

Depth

32 mm

Production

Made

  • 19th century

Source

Credit Line

MAAS Collection, 1955

Acquisition Date

1 April 1955

Cite this Object

Harvard

Babys teething ring and rattle 2020, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 5 March 2021, <https://ma.as/243023>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/243023 |title=Babys teething ring and rattle |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=5 March 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}