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H5321 Half-ship model, SS 'Ulmarra', wood / metal / glass, made by Lithgows Limited Shipbuilders, Port Glasgow, Scotland, 1923. Click to enlarge.

‘Ulmarra’ half-ship model

Made by Lithgows Limited Shipbuilders in Scotland, 1923.

This shipbuilder’s model of the SS ‘Ulmarra’ represents one of the signature vessels that was owned and operated by the North Coast Steam Navigation Co Ltd in the early half of the 20th Century. The ‘Ulmarra’ was a steel steam ship that mainly worked the Clarence River in northern New South Wales, among others.

When the North Coast Steam Navigation Co Ltd went into voluntary liquidation in 1954, the SS ‘Ulmarra’ and SS ‘Uki’ (two of the oldest vessels in the fleet of nine), were still trading u...

Summary

Object No.

H5321

Object Statement

Half-ship model, SS 'Ulmarra', wood / metal / glass, made by Lithgows Limited Shipbuilders, Port Glasgow, Scotland, 1923

Physical Description

Half-ship model, SS 'Ulmarra', wood / metal / glass, made by Lithgows Limited Shipbuilders, Port Glasgow, Scotland, 1923

Shipbuilder's half model of the SS 'Ulmarra' made of wood with metal trimmings and mounted in a rectangular, glass case. The model is shown with deck details including anchors and winches, cleats and bollards, navigation lights, deck winches and cranes, wheelhouse with ship's wheel, binnacle and telegraphs, deck rails and companionways and ventilators. The hull is fitted with a single screw four-blade propeller and the model is finished in green and grey with a red funnel. At the back of the case is a mirror to give the vessel the impression of being whole.

Full-scale specifications:
Length: 46.63m
Beam: 10.55m
Depth: 3.11m
Gross Tonnage: 924 tonnes
Net Tonnage: 439 tonnes

Marks

The label reads 'Screw Steamer / "ULMARRA" / No 751 / Registered Dimensions / 200' x 33.1' x 12.4' / Built by / Lithgows Limited Shipbuilders / Port-Glasgow / 1923'.

Dimensions

Height

470 mm

Width

230 mm

Production

Notes

This half-ship model of the SS 'Ulmarra' was produced by Lithgows Limited Shipbuilders in Port Glasgow, Scotland in 1923.

Lithgows Limited was a British shipbuilding company that was incorporated in 1918 from Russell & Co (the original name of the family shipyard belonging to Sir James Lithgow's family). The company grew throughout the early 20th Century and acquired many lower-Clyde heavy industrial businesses such as Dunlop, Bremner & Co in 1919; Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Co in 1935 and Ferguson Bros in 1961. The company ceased to operate in 1988.

Made

Lithgows Limited Shipbuilders 1923

History

Notes

The SS 'Ulmarra' was owned and operated by the North Coast Steam Navigation Co Ltd from 1923-1954. In 1955, the 'Ulmarra' along with the 'Arakoon' and 'Bangalow' were sold to John Manners & Co in Hong Kong where it was later twice re-named to 'Rozelle Breeze' and 'Papagayo'.

This particular model was donated to the Museum by the North Coast Steam Navigation Co Ltd in 1954.

Used

North Coast Steam Navigation Co Ltd 1923-1954

Source

Credit Line

Gift of North Coast Steam Navigation Co, 1954

Acquisition Date

14 December 1954

Cite this Object

Harvard

'Ulmarra' half-ship model 2018, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 21 January 2019, <https://ma.as/242957>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/242957 |title='Ulmarra' half-ship model |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=21 January 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.

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