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H4494 Ship model in case, of 1928 Manly steam ferry 'Dee Why' operated by Port Jackson & Manly Steamship Co, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1:24 scale, timber, model made by Lieut-Cmdr Geoffrey Chapman Ingleton, RAN, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1937-1938, commissioned for Australian Ses. Click to enlarge.

Model of 1928 Manly ferry ‘Dee Why’ made by Geoffrey Ingleton, 1937-8

Made
  • 1937-1938
This is a model of one of the famous 1928 Manly steam ferries of Sydney, the 'Dee Why'. The model was built between 1937 and 1938 by the most well-known maritime historian of his day, Geoffrey C. Ingleton, for the 150th anniversary of the arrival of the First Fleet into Sydney Harbour. With her identical sistership the 'Curl Curl', the full-size vessels were the mainstay of the Circular Quay to Manly ferry service on Sydney Harbour from 1928 to the 1950s. In that time they carried literally millions of passengers. The vessels were built in Scotland to be a fast service to rival the proposed railway line to the Northern peninsula, which never eventuated.

The full-size 'Dee Why' and sister ship 'Curl Curl' were of 799 tons both built 1927-8 by Napier and Miller Ltd., Old Kirkpatrick, Glasgow, for the Port Jackson and Manly Steamship Co. in Sydney. Both were built as fast, 17- knot (extreme speed 20 knot) ferries and had two unique off-centre stacked funnels, four-cylinder triple-expansion fully reversible marine steam engines, propellers at both ends, and glassed-in top decks. With a crew allowance of 13, they could carry to up to 1587 passengers, reduced to 1199 in rough weather.

The 'Dee Why' has an eventful passage on her delivery to Australia, via Algiers, Aden, and Columbo, taking 5 months and 10 days to complete the voyage. Although identical, 'Dee Why' was finished with a white stripe which came to a point at each end, while on 'Curl Curl' the point went the other way to form a 'swallow tail.

'Dee Why' was withdrawn from service in 1968 and was scuttled 3 and a half km north of Long Reef on Sydney's northern beaches on 25 May 1976. She settled on coarse sand about 41 metres down and had been stripped to the hull beforehand so as not to be a navigation hazard and to not attract divers hunting for souvenirs. 'Curl Curl' had gone off Collaroy Beach in 1968.

The maker of the model was Lieut-Cmdr Geoffrey C. Ingleton, generally recognised to be Australia's foremost maritime historian. During his career with the Hydrographic Office, he published his book "Charting a Continent", the authoritative reference for hydrographic surveying in Australia, planning the Australian chart series and compiling the Australian chart catalogue, and preparing the cartouche for the chart published to commemorate the Cook Bicentennial.

The ferry model was commissioned, together with models of the HMS Supply and Sirius (also in the Museum's collection), by the Australian Sesqui-Centenary Committee to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the arrival of the First Fleet in Port Jackson in 1788. The models were for display in a procession in Sydney entitled 'Australia's March to Nationhood' in 1938. In 1939 the ferry model was presented to the Museum.

Margaret Simpson, Curator
November 2016

Summary

Object No.

H4494

Object Statement

Ship model in case, of 1928 Manly steam ferry 'Dee Why' operated by Port Jackson & Manly Steamship Co, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1:24 scale, timber, model made by Lieut-Cmdr Geoffrey Chapman Ingleton, RAN, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1937-1938, commissioned for Australian Sesqui-Centenary celebrations, 1938

Physical Description

Model scale 1:24. Model is complete with masts, aerials and rigging. Deck details include anchors, deck rails, companionways, ventilators, 2 bridges , 3 ships boats in davits. The hull ,constructed of laminated cedar and sugarpine, is finished in brown and green, with varnished upper works and 2 white and black funnels. The windows are constructed of thin glass squares taked from 35mm photographic slide mounts. The model was reconstructed in 1981 to allow the upper and middle decks to be removed for acccess, and to allow later internal additions to be made.

Dimensions

Height

990 mm

Width

640 mm

Depth

3070 mm

Production

Made

  • 1937-1938

Notes

This model was made by Lieut-Cmdr Geoffrey C. Ingleton, RAN. Geoffrey Chapman Ingleton was born in Bairnsdale, Victoria, on 14 May 1908. In 1922, at the age of 13, he entered the Royal Australian Naval College at Jervis Bay, NSW and 4 years later joined the HMAS Adelaide as a midshipman. Ingleton's naval training included two years in the United Kingdon, where he developed an interest in nautical research. In 1930, after his return to Australia, he was commissioned as a lieutenant. After service on various naval vessels including the Anzac, Tattoo, Vampire and Cerberus, he was assigned to the hydrographic service and served on HMAS Moresby, surveying waters to the north of Australia. In 1936, at the age of 27, he left the Navy, and in 1938 he was granted the rank of lieutenant commander on the retired list. In civilian life Ingleton worked as a draftsman and an artist. From December 1940 until his retirement in 1973, he was employed in the Hydrographic Office.

In private life Ingleton continued his work as an illustrator, and his etchings of early Sydney life were based on extensive knowledge and research. His interest in naval architecture, which derived from ensuring the technical accuracy of his illustrations, led him to construct ship models.

The major source of Ingleton's artistic work was an extensive private collection of books, manuscripts, maps and paintings focusing on early Australia, maritime exploration and coastal development. Ingleton was a member of the Society for Nautical Research, the Hakluyt Society, the Australian Institute of Navigation and the Royal Institute of Navigation and was a significant contributor to their publications.

Ingleton married Josephine Weekes in 1935 and Nan Furness in 1953. He died in Sydney on 28 February, 1998, aged 89 years.

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Australian Sesqui-Centenary Committee, 1939

Acquisition Date

15 September 1939

Cite this Object

Harvard

Model of 1928 Manly ferry 'Dee Why' made by Geoffrey Ingleton, 1937-8 2020, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 30 October 2020, <https://ma.as/240034>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/240034 |title=Model of 1928 Manly ferry 'Dee Why' made by Geoffrey Ingleton, 1937-8 |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=30 October 2020 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}