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H4448-79 Slip on court shoes (pair), part of Joseph Box collection, womens, silk / linen / leather / paper, made by John Thomas for Henry Marshall, London, England, 1883-1885. Click to enlarge.

Pair of slip on court shoes by John Thomas for Henry Marshall

Made
This pair of silk satin slip on court shoes comes from an important collection of footwear and shoemaking objects thought to have been initiated by the London shoemaker, Robert Dixon Box, and consolidated by his son, Joseph Box and the Box Kingham family during the second half of the 1800s. The collection ranges from remnants of leather shoes from the Middle Ages found in English archaeological sites, to intact European shoes from the 1600s onwards, 'foreign' shoes collected as 'curiosities' …

Summary

Object No.

H4448-79

Object Statement

Slip on court shoes (pair), part of Joseph Box collection, womens, silk / linen / leather / paper, made by John Thomas for Henry Marshall, London, England, 1883-1885

Physical Description

Slip on court shoes, pair, womens, silk satin / linen / leather, made by John Thomas for Henry Marshall, London, England, 1883-1885

Pair of womens slip on court shoes of turnshoe construction with narrow oval toes and covered louis heels. Shoes consist of black and ivory silk satin uppers with seams centre front and back, one half black and the other half ivory. A bow trim is stitched at the front peak. Shoes are lined with linen and white kid and the sock is of white kid. Heels seamed in the centre back and are ivory silk satin on one half and black on the other. Leather sole features a polished forepart, tan waist and breast and is black edged with impressed line at front and breast.

(See object file for specialist report by June Swann)

Marks

Manufacturer on sock of both shoes, pasted printed paper label, text in black, within black border, 'BY APPOINTMENT TO HER MAJESTY' around curved top edge of label, beneath coat of arms, 'HENRY MARSHALL / LATE / PATTISON, / BOOTMAKER / H.R.H. the Duke of Edingburgh / H.R.H. Princess Louis of Hesse / H.R.H. Princess Christian / 154. Oxford Street, / London'

Number on outsole, handwritten in pencil, '2618'

Dimensions

Height

120 mm

Width

70 mm

Production

Notes

This pair of slip on court shoes was made by John Thomas was made by John Thomas for Henry Marshall. The 1965 Box collection list describes, ' a pair of white and black satin Domino shoes. All work in the uppers and soles is by hand. Made by John Thomas, a Welshman who worked for Henry Marshall, 154 Oxford St London'. June Swann, footwear specialist, notes that Henry Marshall was only located at Oxford Street from 1883-1885.

History

Notes

This pair of silk satin slip court shoes is part of the Museum's significant Joseph Box collection. The 1965 Box collection list describes, ' a pair of white and black satin Domino shoes. All work in the uppers and soles is by hand. Made by John Thomas, a Welshman who worked for Henry Marshall, 154 Oxford St London'. June Swann, footwear specialist, notes that Henry Marshall was located at Oxford Street from 1883-1885 only.

Joseph Box Ltd had its origins in a London shoemaking business established in 1808 by a 'ladies shoemaker' called James Sly. From 1816 Sly's apprentice was Robert Dixon Box, the fifteen-year-old son of a bankrupted Quaker attorney. Box was to become manager of the business when Sly died in 1826, and gained a reputation for fine shoemaking through its participation at international exhibitions and by obtaining Royal Warrants. The business became known as Joseph Box Ltd in 1862 after it was transferred to Robert's son, Joseph. Like his father, Joseph started in the trade at the age of 15, but retired at the relatively early age of 42 to enable his daughters to enter society. Although he transferred the business to his cousins the Box Kinghams in 1882, Joseph maintained an active interest in shoemaking through collecting. At the end of the century the business was later taken over by royal shoemakers Gundry & Sons, which was itself taken over by John Lobb Ltd some time after 1953.

The collection acquired by the Museum in 1942 was probably started by Robert Dixon and consolidated by Joseph Box and the Box Kinghams during the second half of the 1800s. It includes remnants of leather shoes from the Middle Ages found in English archaeological sites, intact European shoes from the 1600s onwards, 'foreign' shoes collected as 'curiosities' from around the world, shoe buckles and spurs, as well as documents relating to Joseph Box Ltd.

Footwear scholar, June Swann, former Keeper of the Boot and Shoe Collection at the Northampton Museum in England was invited to catalogue this very significant collection in 1993. A large selection was subsequently featured in the Museum's 1997 exhibition and accompanying publication 'Stepping out: three centuries of shoes'.

REF:
Mitchell, Louise, with Lindie Ward, 'Stepping out: three centuries of shoes', Powerhouse Publishing, Sydney, 1997

Cite this Object

Harvard

Pair of slip on court shoes by John Thomas for Henry Marshall 2021, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 7 May 2021, <https://ma.as/239838>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/239838 |title=Pair of slip on court shoes by John Thomas for Henry Marshall |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=7 May 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}