X-ray tube, glass / metal, attributed to Walter Drowley Filmer, used in Newcastle, NSW, glass/metal, circa 1896

Made in London, England, circa 1896.

Late in 1895 German scientist Wilhelm Roentgen published his momentous discovery of mysterious rays that could pass through flesh and make an image of the bones inside. The news travelled swiftly around the world. Within weeks Walter Drowley Filmer had used X-rays to locate a broken needle in a patient’s foot in February 1896 at Newcastle Hospital, New South Wales. X-rays are produced by bombarding a metal plate with an electric current inside a glass vacuum tube.

Amongst the vast collection of...

Summary

H4327
X-ray tube, glass / metal, attributed to Walter Drowley Filmer, used in Newcastle, NSW, glass/metal, circa 1896

Glass sphere with two small bulbs at each end. The bulb at the top contains a slender glass tube, from which hangs a small metal square. A curved, slender glass tube is attached to the exterior of the bulb. The lower bulb contains a small concave dish, fixed to a stand.
A label attached to the sphere describes this as the first x-ray tube used in Newcastle, 1896.
(-X) Perspex stand

Production

Information taken from incomplete manufacturer's label. See marks field.

Professor Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen discovered X-rays in December, 1895.
circa 1896

History

This X-ray tube is part of a collection donated on 22 October 1917, by Hon. H.M. Doyle to the Newcastle Museum (1890-1941). The Newcastle Museum was a branch of the Technological Museum (later called MAAS). When the Newcastle Museum closed in 1941, its collection was acquired by the Technological Museum.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article133209224 Filmer volunteered for Boer War
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article83250576 1897 Stereo X-rays to see depth of bullet
http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/8613184 book held by SLNSW
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article99420653 1897 Filmer radiographed mouse organs
Newcastle Museum

Source

Gift of Hon Henry Martin Doyle, MLC, 1941
22 April, 1941

Cite this Object

X-ray tube, glass / metal, attributed to Walter Drowley Filmer, used in Newcastle, NSW, glass/metal, circa 1896 2014, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 20 September 2017, <https://ma.as/238915>
{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/238915 |title=X-ray tube, glass / metal, attributed to Walter Drowley Filmer, used in Newcastle, NSW, glass/metal, circa 1896 |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=20 September 2017 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}
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