The Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences acknowledges Australia’s First Nations Peoples as the Traditional Owners and Custodians of the land and gives respect to the Elders – past and present – and through them to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are advised that the MAAS website contains a range of Indigenous Cultural Material. This includes artworks, artifacts, images and recordings of people who may have passed away, and other objects which may be culturally sensitive.
H4286 Typewriter, Sholes & Glidden Type Writer, metal/wood/glass/paint, Sholes & Glidden, E Remington & Sons, 1874-1878.. Click to enlarge.

Typewriter, Sholes & Glidden Type Writer, metal/wood/glass/paint, Sholes & Glidden, E Remington & Sons, 1874-1878.

Made by E Remington & Sons in New York, New York state, United States, North and Central America, 1874-1878.

Typewriter, Sholes & Glidden Type Writer, metal/wood/glass/paint, Sholes &
Glidden, E Remington & Sons, 1874-1878.

Typewriter, “Sholes & Glidden type writer” one of the first commercally produced typewriters designed by Christopher Latham Sholes, and produced by E.Remington & Sons, Gunmakers from 1874-1878, not more than 5,000 were sold.

The mechanical typewriter has a black painted metal casing decorated with gold and colourful decals. There is a flap at the front bearing flags and a crest, t...

Summary

Object No.

H4286

Object Statement

Typewriter, Sholes & Glidden Type Writer, metal/wood/glass/paint, Sholes & Glidden, E Remington & Sons, 1874-1878.

Physical Description

Typewriter, Sholes & Glidden Type Writer, metal/wood/glass/paint, Sholes &
Glidden, E Remington & Sons, 1874-1878.

Typewriter, "Sholes & Glidden type writer" one of the first commercally produced typewriters designed by Christopher Latham Sholes, and produced by E.Remington & Sons, Gunmakers from 1874-1878, not more than 5,000 were sold.

The mechanical typewriter has a black painted metal casing decorated with gold and colourful decals. There is a flap at the front bearing flags and a crest, this lifts to reveal the alphanumeric keyboard, there are 42 keys with two keys missing in a standard QWERTY layout. This is the first typewriter to use the QWERTY keyboard, the keys are metal with clear glass tops, the characters underneath are black printed on white, the space bar is dark brown wood (possibly non-original), the underside of the cover has a central floral arrangement.
The typewriter is of an "upstrike" design, the letters sit on the end of rods called "typebars', the typebars hang in a circle in the middle of the top surface plate, the roller or platen, that held the paper, sat over this hole, when the keys are pressed the typebar swings up and strikes the platen from the underneath. This method meant that the text was hidden from view, so the machine was called a "blind writer", the roller is on a hinge so that the work can be checked. There is a wheel on the right side of the casing.
On the top half of the case there are two flaps, one front and one at the back, that give access to the internal workings of the typewriter, both are decorated inside and out with floral tranfers. Each side of the case bears a crest, while the back panel has a large rose in the centre.
Gold lettering on the centre front of the housing has worn/faded leaving it illegible.

Marks

The typewriter has had gold text on the centre front panel, this is now worn and illegible

Dimensions

Height

350 mm

Width

385 mm

Depth

410 mm

Production

Notes

This type writer was designed by Christopher Latham Sholes in Milwaulkee Wisconsin in 1868, with the assistance of Carlos Glidden, a worker from the Klienstuber Machine shop, where the prototype was produced.The prototype was sent to Washington as the required patent Model. This original belongs to the Smithsonian
Shole designed the QWERTY keybord for this machine, the original model had the keys arranged in aphabetical order, but the 'typebars' would clash and jam. Shole took the most common pairing of letters such as "TH" and made sure that the typebars were hung well away from each other. To do this he used a study of letter pairing produced by educator Amos Densmore, brother of James Densmore who purchased the patent from Shole and becme the finacial backer of the Type Writer.

The Patent for the Sholes & Glidden type writer was sold to an investor by the name of James Densmore, who eventually brought the machine to Remington. Remington agreed to produce the machine commencing in 1873, it was not terribly succesful and sold only 5000 units between 1873 and 1878, when Remington released the 'Remington No.2' which typed both upper and lower case (the Sholes & Glidden only typed capitals).

This typewriter was produced by Remington between these dates

Source

Credit Line

Gift of Chartres Ltd, 1940

Acquisition Date

27 September 1940

Cite this Object

Harvard

Typewriter, Sholes & Glidden Type Writer, metal/wood/glass/paint, Sholes & Glidden, E Remington & Sons, 1874-1878. 2018, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 23 September 2019, <https://ma.as/238772>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/238772 |title=Typewriter, Sholes & Glidden Type Writer, metal/wood/glass/paint, Sholes & Glidden, E Remington & Sons, 1874-1878. |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=23 September 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}

Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.

Know more about this object?

TELL US

Have a question about this object?

ASK US