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H4099 Sword (<i>shamshir</i>) and scabbard, steel / walrus ivory / wood / shagreen leather, probably Isfahan, Persia (Iran), Qajar era, 1800s. Click to enlarge.

Sword (shamshir) and scabbard شمشیر و غلاف شمشیر

Made
This curved wedge-shaped blade (shamshir) is one of two (H7905) fine handmade swords from early 19th century Persia (Iran) in the Powerhouse collection. An object used for ceremony and performance, it was probably made by a master sword maker (shamshirsaz) from the city of Isfahan during the Qajar era.

The sword's handle slabs are made of walrus ivory and the spatulated quillons, cross-guard (bolchaq) and pommel cap (kolahak) are made of steel, beautifully decorated with engraved …

Summary

Object No.

H4099

Object Statement

Sword (shamshir) and scabbard, steel / walrus ivory / wood / shagreen leather, probably Isfahan, Persia (Iran), Qajar era, 1800s

Physical Description

Handmade, curved, wedge-shaped blade. The handle slabs are made of walrus ivory and the spatulated quillons, cross-guard (bolchaq) and pommel cap (kolahak) are made of steel, decorated with engraved gold-overlay bird and floral motifs. The underside features two embedded gold-inlaid cartouches.

Wooden scabbard consisting of two parts glued together and covered with shagreen leather (saghari). One of the scabbard fittings (varband) is missing.

Production

Made

Notes

This object was produced during the Qajar era (1789-1925).

Source

Credit Line

Gift of the Australian Museum, 1938

Acquisition Date

21 December 1938

Cite this Object

Harvard

Sword (shamshir) and scabbard شمشیر و غلاف شمشیر 2021, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 27 October 2021, <https://ma.as/238426>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/238426 |title=Sword (shamshir) and scabbard شمشیر و غلاف شمشیر |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=27 October 2021 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}