Voice-activated ship’s telephone

Naval phone, used in connection with the engine room of H.M.A.S. Australia, metal, made by Alfred Graham & Company, Crofton Park, London, England, c.1911

This ‘loud-speaking’ hands-free voice-activated phone is made mainly of brass, and some parts are painted white. The speaker’s voice caused a metal diaphragm to vibrate, which moved a wire coil within a magnetic field. This generated sufficient current to power the phone.

Summary

H3204A
Naval phone, used in connection with the engine room of H.M.A.S. Australia, metal, made by Alfred Graham & Company, Crofton Park, London, England, c.1911

This 'loud-speaking' hands-free voice-activated phone is made mainly of brass, and some parts are painted white. The speaker’s voice caused a metal diaphragm to vibrate, which moved a wire coil within a magnetic field. This generated sufficient current to power the phone.

Dimensions

290 mm
370 mm
220 mm

History

The phone was installed on the first HMAS Australia, where it was used to communicate between the bridge and the engine room.
HMAS Australia

Source

Gift of Navy Office, Department of Defence, 1924

Cite this Object

Voice-activated ship's telephone 2016, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 29 March 2017, <https://ma.as/236423>
{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/236423 |title=Voice-activated ship's telephone |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=29 March 2017 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}
Full description  
This object is currently on display in Store 3 at the Museums Discovery Centre
Incomplete

This object record is currently incomplete. Other information may exist in a non-digital form. The Museum continues to update and add new research to collection records.

Know more about this object?
TELL US
Have a question about this object?
ASK US