The Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences acknowledges Australia’s First Nations Peoples as the Traditional Owners and Custodians of the land and gives respect to the Elders – past and present – and through them to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are advised that the MAAS website contains a range of Indigenous Cultural Material. This includes artworks, artifacts, images and recordings of people who may have passed away, and other objects which may be culturally sensitive.
H2954 Cable-laying ship model, 'The Faraday', wood / metal / paint, made by Daniel Aldous, Australia, 1888-1907. Click to enlarge.

Cable-laying ship model, ‘The Faraday’, wood / metal / paint, made by Daniel Aldous, Australia, 1888-1907

Made in Australia, Oceania, 1888-1907.

This is a model of the trans-Atlantic cable-laying ship the 'Faraday' which was especially designed to lay telegraph cable in the world's oceans. Beginning in 1874 and continuing for the next 50 years, the ship lay an estimated total of 50,000 nautical miles (93,000 km) of cable for Siemens Brothers, including several trans-Atlantic cables. This model, made between 1888 and 1907, is particularly significant because it was made by Daniel Aldous, an electrical mechanic, who served on board the 'F...

Summary

Object No.

H2954

Object Statement

Cable-laying ship model, 'The Faraday', wood / metal / paint, made by Daniel Aldous, Australia, 1888-1907

Physical Description

Cable-laying ship model, 'The Faraday', wood / metal / paint, made by Daniel Aldous, Australia, 1888-1907

Dimensions

Height

590 mm

Width

300 mm

Depth

970 mm

Production

Made

Australia, Oceania 1888-1907

Notes

Mr Aldous was born in England at West Ham. He and his wife Eliza (nee Turner) and two sons arrived in Melbourne aboard the 'Orient' in December 1888. They appear on the electoral roll as living at Penshurst NSW in 1916. Eliza died in 1922 and Daniel died in 1927. (information supplied by Mr Malcolm Aldous, great grandson of Daniel Aldous.)

History

Notes

This cableship was laid down in 1873 and launched in February 1874. She is 5,000 tons register, 360 feet long, 52 feet beam and 30 feet deep. In her interior are three enormous iron tanks for recieving 1,700 miles of cable, which are so built into the body of the ship as to greatly add to the strength of the structure. Two are 45 feet in diameter and 30 feet deep. The third is somewhat smaller.

She has on board a complete outfit of machinery for laying cables in the most efficient manner as well as for grappling and recovering lost cables. Many of the parts of her structure and apparatus showed considerable novelty of design at that time, among which may be mentioned the twin-screw-propeller. Another admirable arrangement is that both her funnels are ABREAST of each other thereby allowing the bale to be played out amidship.

The gearing, fore and aft, for laying and picking up cables, is also conspicuous. She is lighted throughout by electricity and has proved herself to be a good sea-going vessel, and is capable of laying and recovering cables at all depths even in dirty weather.

Source

Credit Line

Purchased 1907

Acquisition Date

11 October 1907

Cite this Object

Harvard

Cable-laying ship model, 'The Faraday', wood / metal / paint, made by Daniel Aldous, Australia, 1888-1907 2019, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 17 February 2020, <https://ma.as/235941>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/235941 |title=Cable-laying ship model, 'The Faraday', wood / metal / paint, made by Daniel Aldous, Australia, 1888-1907 |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=17 February 2020 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}
This object is currently on display in Collection Gallery 2 at the Museums Discovery Centre.

Know more about this object?

TELL US

Have a question about this object?

ASK US