Walking stick with scrimshaw decoration, made by Alfred Evans

Made by Evans, Alfred in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 1847-1857.

The word scrimshaw is primarily used to describe the carving and decoration of baleen (sometimes referred to as whalebone) and skeletal bones and teeth (sometimes referred to as ivory). Other materials used are horn, wood and walrus tusks.

Whale scrimshaw objects were derived from two groups of whales; the Mysticeti (baleen whales), and the Odontoceti, the toothed whale. Mysticeti, ‘Right’ whales, are found in colder waters and were the first to be used commercially. Odontoceti, ‘Sperm’ whales,...

Summary

E4526
Walking stick; Made from Whales teeth & Bones (Jaw) by Mr. Alfred Evans from Whales caught off the Australain Coast 1852; Locality: Australia; 1914/710 (SB). File 69/3374 (SB). Walking stick of whale bone with tortoiseshell inlay. Austarlian. Evans donation. (LC).

Production

This walking stick was made by Alfred Evans in Sydney, Australia around 1847-1857.
Evans, Alfred 1847-1857

Source

Presented by Mrs Alfred Evans, 1914
3 June, 1914

Cite this Object

Walking stick with scrimshaw decoration, made by Alfred Evans 2014, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 17 November 2017, <https://ma.as/228174>
{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/228174 |title=Walking stick with scrimshaw decoration, made by Alfred Evans |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=17 November 2017 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}
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