Triple expansion marine steam engine

Made by R.W. Hawthorn-Leslie Limited in Newcastle upon Tyne, England, 1889.

The triple expansion engine is a stage in the evolution of the steam engine which began with the Newcomen atmospheric engine. In this type of engine the steam was introduced in to a cylinder at low pressure and temperature and condensed. This formed a vacuum in the cylinder which allowed the weight of air above the piston to force the piston down. The next development was to use the steam positively in association with the condensing action. Again the steam pressure was relatively low as was th...

Summary

Object No.

B681-1

Physical Description

A triple expansion engine from the steamer 'Pheasant' and later 'Karrabee'. The engine has three cranks and three cylinders. The body of the engine is painted green while the cranks are unpainted. Oil residue is evident on the cranks. In the middle of the cranks there is a wheel with six handles. The engine stands four metres high, three metres wide and deep and weighs about 9 tonnes.

Marks

An old MAAS label accompanying this object reads, 'TRIPLE EXPANSION / MARINE ENGINE / THIS ENGINE WAS EXHIBITED AT / THE INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION, / GARDEN PALACE, SYDNEY, OPENED IN / 1879, BEFORE INSTALLATION IN THE / STEAMERS "PHEASANT" AND "KARRABEE" / IT WAS IN ALMOST CONTINUOUS USE / UNTIL OCTOBER, 1936. / PRESENTED BY SYDNEY FERRIES LIMITED, OCTOBER, 1936'.

Dimensions

Height

4000 mm

Width

3000 mm

Depth

3000 mm

Production

Notes

Triple expansion marine engine serial number 2136 was manufactured in 1889 by Hawthorn Leslie and Company, Newcastle upon-Tyne, England at a cost of 2088 pounds 19 shillings and 4 pence against a contract price of 1115 pounds. Marine engines had been built at the Forth Banks works, but production was transferred to the St Peters works, which opened in 1871. However, engine serial number 2136 was manufactured at the Forth Banks works, the last engine manufactured there.

Made

R.W. Hawthorn-Leslie Limited 1889

History

Notes

The engine was ordered from Hawthorn Leslie and Company by Mr Charles Edward Jeanneret (1834-1898) , Partner in and Manager of the Parramatta River Company. When received in 1889 the engine was installed in 'S.S Pheasant' a triple deck, single ended ferry capable of carrying 489 passengers. The 'Pheasant' was built by J. Pashley at Balmain in 1889. The engine was reputed to have been displayed at Sydney's 1879 International Exhibition. However, the engine was manufactured seven years after the Exhibition was destroyed by fire. Also, there is no reference to either "Hawthorn Leslie" or to large triple expansion marine engines in Norman Selfe's report on the machinery section of the 1879 Sydney International Exhibition.

The 'Pheasant' was sold along with the company to Philip B Walker who ran the company until 1893 when it was recapitalised as a limited liability company; "Parramatta River Steamers and Tramway Company". In 1900 the 'Pheasant' was sold to Sydney Ferries Ltd and was converted to a lighter in 1914. The engine was removed from the 'Pheasant' at this time and transferred in the Sydney Ferries Ltd newly built ferry, the 'Karrabee' that same year. In 1936 the 'Karrabee' was re-engineed with a diesel and the triple expansion steam engine donated to the Museum.

Used

1879-1936

Source

Credit Line

Gift of State Transit Sydney Ferries, 1936

Acquisition Date

18 November 1936

Cite this Object

Harvard

Triple expansion marine steam engine 2018, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 19 November 2018, <https://ma.as/214585>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/214585 |title=Triple expansion marine steam engine |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=19 November 2018 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}
This object is currently on display in Store 3 at the Museums Discovery Centre.

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