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B669 Telegraph, five-needle Cooke and Wheatstone, wood / metal / glass, made by William Cooke and Charles Wheatstone, England, c. 1837-1842. Click to enlarge.

Five needle Cooke and Wheatstone telegraph

Made
This is a five needle Cooke and Wheatstone telegraph dating from between 1837 and 1842. The combination transmitter and receiver was used on English railways and this telegraph is believed to be one of the actual instruments used on the first line between Windsor and Slough.

Summary

Object No.

B669

Object Statement

Telegraph, five-needle Cooke and Wheatstone, wood / metal / glass, made by William Cooke and Charles Wheatstone, England, c. 1837-1842

Physical Description

Cooke and Wheatstone's five-needle telegraph in a dark brown polished wood frame with decorative scrolls at either end, with brass attachments and a glass cover over a diamond shaped silvered face. There is a horizontal brass rod in the centre of the face with five needles spaced evenly along it. The letters on the face are in a diamond shaped arrangement, joined by lines. The frame is attached to a wooden rectangular base with a curved platform which protrudes, with six pairs of white buttons and springs. The back consists of a series of five pairs of wire coils.

Dimensions

Height

785 mm

Width

675 mm

Depth

340 mm

Source

Credit Line

Gift of AC Webb, 1936

Acquisition Date

8 March 1936

Cite this Object

Harvard

Five needle Cooke and Wheatstone telegraph 2022, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 1 December 2022, <https://ma.as/214558>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/214558 |title=Five needle Cooke and Wheatstone telegraph |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=1 December 2022 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}