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1212-4 Back-comb, for hair, mantilla style, stained ox horn, made by Stewart and Company, Aberdeen, Scotland, 1873-1883. Click to enlarge.

A hair comb made from ox horn.

Made 1873-1883

Plastics have been described as “materials that can be moulded or shaped into different forms under pressure or heat.” In the twentieth century the move away from natural raw materials to synthetically produced plastics changed the way objects were produced, designed and used.

Before the arrival of synthetic resins natural plastics such as amber, horn, tortoiseshell, bitumen, shellac, gutta-percha and rubber were used to mould and manufacture artefacts. Horn was the most accessible of these fo...

Summary

Object No.

1212-4

Object Statement

Back-comb, for hair, mantilla style, stained ox horn, made by Stewart and Company, Aberdeen, Scotland, 1873-1883

Physical Description

Back-comb, for hair, mantilla style, stained ox horn, made by Stewart and Company, Aberdeen, Scotland, 1873-1883

Rectangular mantilla style comb with eight teeth. The crown of the comb curves outwards with a border of circular shapes surmounted by three stylised flowers and acanthus leaves on either side.

Dimensions

Height

140 mm

Width

100 mm

Depth

25 mm

Production

Made

1873-1883

Cite this Object

Harvard

A hair comb made from ox horn. 2019, Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, accessed 11 December 2019, <https://ma.as/2127>

Wikipedia

{{cite web |url=https://ma.as/2127 |title=A hair comb made from ox horn. |author=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences |access-date=11 December 2019 |publisher=Museum of Applied Arts & Sciences, Australia}}
This object is currently on display in Collection Gallery 2 at the Museums Discovery Centre.

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